search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
DEREGULATION


In addition to the above test in the LGMPA 1976 there exists other checks and balances in the form of the: Regulators’ Code 2014: https://bit.ly/2PIh0P2


Whilst this is not actual legislation, all regulators including licensing authori- ties are expected to adhere to it; it is a code not merely guidance.


As the Regulators’ Code applies to all regulators and not just licensing authorities, I shall select the most relevant sections.


In the foreword written by Michael Fallon, the Minister of State for Business and Enterprise at that time, it is stated:


“This Government is committed to reducing regulatory burdens and supporting compliant business growth through the development of an open and constructive relationship between regulators and those they regulate. The Regulators’ Code provides a flexible, principles-based framework for regulatory delivery that supports and enables regulators to design their service and enforcement policies in a manner that best suits the needs of businesses and other regulated entities.”*


(*Emphasised by author)


Such words of comfort (for us) would probably come as a culture shock to a number of councils:


“You mean, we have to be nice to these, er, people and adopt a can-do approach instead of putting up barriers and show- ing them who’s boss?


Open and constructive? Seriously? Bad times!”


I wonder if some councils, even to this day, have ever read the document! I’m thinking of one in particular, quite close to Wales but not actually in Wales...


APRIL 2021


1. Regulators should carry out their activities in a way that supports those they regulate to comply and grow


1.1 Regulators should avoid imposing unnecessary regulatory burdens through their regulatory activities and should assess whether similar social, environmental and economic outcomes could be achieved by less burdensome means. Regulators should choose proportionate approaches to those they regulate, based on relevant. factors including, for example, business size and capacity.


1.2 When designing and reviewing policies, operational procedures and practices, regulators should consider how they might support or enable economic growth for compliant businesses and other regulated entities, for example, by considering how they can best:


• understand and minimise negative economic impacts of their regulatory activities;


• minimising the costs of compliance for those they regulate;


• improve confidence in compliance for those they regulate, by providing greater certainty; and


• encourage and promote compliance.


I’ve emboldened the most pertinent parts and they require no further explanation.


2. Regulators should provide simple and straightforward ways to engage with those they regulate and hear their views


2.1 Regulators should have mechanisms in place to engage those they regulate, citizens and others to offer views and contribute to the development of their policies and service standards. Before changing policies, practices or service standards, regulators should consider the impact on business and engage with business representatives.


Basically, councils are required to consult in good faith and engage with all interested parties and their representatives and not cherry pick who to engage with.


2.2 In responding to non-compliance that they identify, regulators should clearly explain what the non-compliant item or activity is, the advice being given, actions required or decisions taken, and the reasons for these. Regulators should provide an opportunity for dialogue in relation to the advice, requirements or decisions, with a view to ensuring that they are acting in a way that is proportionate and consistent.


33


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96