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PROUD OF OUR TRADE


SCOTS CABBIE TO RUN ENTIRE WEST HIGHLAND WAY IN 24 HOURS FOR HOSPICE CHARITY


A Scots cabbie, inspired by stories of passengers affected by terminal cancer, is taking on an epic challenge to raise money for their loved ones’ end of life care. Stephen Logan aims to run the West Highland Way in one 24-hour stint for Marie Curie Hospice in Glasgow. The 48-year-old will set off at midnight on June 20 with hopes to complete the gruelling 96-mile route by midnight on June 21. According to the Daily Record, Stephen has often provided a listening ear to patients’ relatives, as he’s ferried them to and from the New Stobhill Hospital in his cab over the years. Touched by their tales and aware of the charity’s inability to raise vital funds during the coronavirus pandemic, the dad-of- three wanted to take matters into his own hands. Stephen, from Bishopbriggs, East Dun-


CASTLE DOUGLAS CABBIE RAISES £100s FOR CHARITY


bartonshire, told the Record: “I often say being a taxi driver is like being a priest; people open up and for years I’ve heard nothing but amazing things about Marie Curie Hospice and the care they give at the end of someone’s life. “I found out that the hospice relies heavily on donations from the public. The pandemic has made this more dif- ficult for the hospice, that’s why I wanted to do something.”


Going sober 12 years ago led to Stephen taking up running for the first time and he never looked back. “It started with five and 10k runs, which went onto half marathons,” Stephen added. Then a couple of years ago I started marathons, I’ve even been to Morocco to do them.” The one challenge Stephen is yet to complete is pounding the path of the West Highland Way in 24 hours. Stretching from Milngavie in East Dun- bartonshire to Fort William in the Highlands, the route will test Stephen, and fellow runners hoping to join him, to the limit. “I’m determined to get it done in the 24-hour stint for Marie Curie who are fully supporting me.” Stephen has a fundraising target of £10,000. You can donate by heading to his official JustGiving page: https://bit.ly/3t4y6EZ


CARDIFF TAXI DRIVERS RAISE MORE THAN £10,000 FOR FOOD BANKS


Cardiff taxi drivers have been thanked for raising thousands of pounds for local food banks at a time when many have seen their incomes plummet. According to ITV News, taxi driver and Unite branch secretary Yusef Jama said the support was a lifeline for many. “We


knew drivers were struggling to


A Castle Douglas taxi driver raised hun- dreds of pounds for charity by taking part in the Dee Dip. According to the Daily Record, Sheila Scott braved the chilly waters of Loch Ken with other revellers on New Year’s Day to raise money for Macmillan Can- cer Support. And in doing so, she raised the fine sum of £717.


APRIL 2021


feed their families. We had drivers who’ve got anxiety and depression, and many other concerns. Sometimes they were even going to food banks themselves.” Yusef decided to rally his fellow drivers to contribute money for local charities, including Cardiff Foodbank. Each con- tributed whatever they could afford. Together, they raised more than £10,000. The money has been shared among several food banks and community


projects in the capital. Hugely generous donations of both food and money during this pandemic has been extraordinary. The drivers credit Yusef’s friendly encouragement and determination to meet their target. Taxi driver Paul O’Hara said: “Yusef has done a marvellous job campaigning and getting everybody on board and collecting the money. Every little bit helps”.


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