search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
GOLF ARCHITEC T S


12th hole at Titirangi Golf Club


in 1896 aſter starting as a club-maker, winning the Open Championship five times before embarking on golf course designing. He’s said to be the inventor of the dogleg hole and designed more than 200 courses in the British Isles. Among his most famous creations are the King’s and Queen’s courses at Gleneagles. He also remodelled Open venues Carnoustie and Royal Troon, and co-founded the PGA. PLAY: Church Course, St Enodoc Golf Club, Rock, Cornwall This undulating layout near Rock, in Cornwall, is ranked among England’s top links, its tight fairways overlooking the River Camel estuary with several holes encircling a lovely old church with a bent spire, where former Poet Laureate Sir John Betjeman is buried. Green fees from £45. st-enodoc.co.uk


Donald Ross (1872-1948) A trained joiner, Ross became apprentice golf club-maker to Old Tom Morris at St Andrews, returning to his Scotish Highlands home course, Royal Dornoch, as its first golf professional and greenkeeper. He moved to America aged 27 and although a successful golfer with top-10 finishes


countrybycountry.com 35


in five US Opens and one Open Championship, he is best known for his designs, creating or redesigning some 400 courses in North America. Known for natural layouts with wide fairways and small greens like upturned saucers, his designs include Pinehurst’s No 2, a four-time US Open venue, Oak Hill (host of four majors and the 1995 Ryder Cup) and Tour Championship venue East Lake. PLAY: Donald Ross Course, French Lick Resort, Indiana One of French Lick’s four 18-hole courses, a $5m restoration has returned it to the original 1917 design, including Ross’s trademark bunkers with flat botoms and steep faces. Green fees from £56. frenchlick.com


AW Tillinghast (1876-1942) America’s first course architect and among its most prolific, Tillinghast was also one of its least likely. The spoiled only son of a rubber baron and a delinquent Philadelphia gang member, Tillie the Terror, as he was known, found his calling when his dad took him to St Andrews aged 20. There, Old Tom Morris became his golfing mentor. Soon a top amateur golfer, a family friend requested his help to build a course in Pennsylvania in 1907, launching a career that would encompass more than 260 courses. He strove to produce beautiful courses that were true tests of golf but fair for all golfers, inventing the double dogleg and craſting such masterworks as major championship


Gasparilla Golf Club


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236