search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
IMAGES: GETTY


POR TU G AL


L


For city lovers


isbon is a tale of two time warps, one romantically creaky, one pointing towards a dazzling future. Wooden


trams and iron funiculars link up the city’s seven hills with varying degrees of speed. Small boats ply the Tagus Estuary, its shores a pastel-coloured patchwork of riverfront homes. Since it was rebuilt aſter the catastrophic earthquake of 1755, the Praca Dom Pedro IV has been used as a catle market, a bullring and a place for public executions. Today, it’s the city’s beating heart, surrounded by cafes full of tourists soaking up the atmosphere. Top of the sights, Castelo de Sao Jorge,


Alfama’s magnificent fortified palace dating back to the ninth-century Moorish occupation. Torre de Belem, guarding the entrance to the harbour at the mouth of the Tagus, is an imposing symbol of Lisbon’s proud maritime history. The Gulbenkian Museum displays priceless artefacts — Hellenic vases, Chinese


porcelain, paintings by Rembrandt, Van Dyck and Monet — giſted by the Armenian philanthropist to his favourite city. Following the success of Expo 1998,


Lisbon embraced the future at the Parque das Nacoes, created on derelict industrial land to the east of the centre. Many visitors disembark at the Estacao do Oriente, a glass and steel cathedral of a station designed by controversial Spanish architect, Santiago Calatrava. Vasco da Gama, the aristocrat who discovered the sea route to India in 1498, gets top billing, with a namesake 475ſt tower and two smaller ones, Sao Gabriel and Sao Raphael, named aſter his ships. He also has his own strikingly modernist eight-mile bridge across the Tagus. Lisbon comes alive aſter dark, especially


in former warehouses turned super clubs in the docklands. The leader of the pack is Lux, owned by John Malkovich, a pillared cavern with a giant gliterball, soſt sofas and dance space for massed fashionistas. They drink their dawn cocktails on the rooſtop terrace.


To join them, you have to pass the ‘cool’ test at the door. For a more relaxed approach, trawl the cobbled Bairro Alto for smokey bars, play pool in the museum of kitsch that is Pavilhao Chines or track fado, Lisbon’s hauntingly mournful 19th-century music, back to source in dedicated clubs. Hangover? Head out to Praia do Guincho


in the Serra de Sintra national park. Wind and kite surfers tackle massive Atlantic rollers within sight of Cabo da Roca, the western edge of Europe. Even if you don’t join them, have lunch at Fortaleza de Guincho. A tumultuous city break deserves it.


Penha Longa Resort The Sintra Mountains loom over Robert Trent Jones Jr’s Atlantico championship course, a track considered good enough to host the Portuguese Open two years after its inauguration in 1992. Opulent green foothills frame holes with views of Cascais, Estoril and the Atlantic. Hazards include lakes, sharp changes in elevation and rocky outcrops. The


countrybycountry.com


121


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236