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GOLF ARCHITEC T S


golf by design


Playing a course created by famous golf architects gives golfers a real buzz — but it doesn’t mean having to splash out for the privilege. Besides creations hosting top championship events, there are lesser-known designer-label gems around the world that offer great value. Peter Ellegard investigates


Harry S Colt (1869-1951) A successful lawyer, Colt became Sunningdale Golf Club’s first secretary and designed its New Course. In 1918, he helped create Pine Valley, ranked today as America’s top course. He teamed up with fellow Englishmen Charles Alison, John Morrison and Alister MacKenzie to design over 300 courses in 16 countries, including the home nations and across Europe, the US and Canada — over 100 of them on his own. Regarded as the pioneer of modern golf course architecture, Colt’s specialities were his signature par-three holes and strategic fairway bunkers. Other sole creations include Royal Portrush’s Dunluce layout, the 2019 Open Championship course, and Wentworth’s West course.


34 ABTA Golf 2018


PLAY: Belvoir Park Golf Club, Belfast This unsung Colt gem has hosted the Irish Open and is just three miles from Belfast yet feels a world away from the city with its fairways edged by mature trees and its clubhouse looking out to mountains. Green fees from £30. belvoirparkgolfclub.com


Alister MacKenzie (1870-1934) English-born with Scotish parents, MacKenzie trained as a surgeon before switching professions aſter World War I, having already designed several courses, then moving to America in the 1920s. His ethos was to imitate nature, his designs featuring free-form bunkers and long, undulating greens. He designed more than


50 courses in England, Scotland, Ireland, the US, South America, New Zealand and Australia, among them revered masterpieces Lahinch, Royal Melbourne, Cypress Point and Augusta National, home of The Masters. PLAY: Titirangi Golf Club, Auckland New Zealand MacKenzie’s only design in New Zealand is one of the country’s top venues and remains a walking course as he intended. Its rolling fairways are set amidst lush native bush just 20 minutes from Auckland city centre. Green fees from £80 titirangigolf.co.nz


James Braid (1870-1950) Scotsman Braid turned professional golfer


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