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DESTINATIONS INDIAN OCEAN | NATURE


5 DENIS ISLAND, THE SEYCHELLES


Turtles laying eggs on the shoreline, exotic birds flying overhead and no-filter-needed beaches to accompany it all – there’s a reason this private island has gained a worldwide rep, and it’s not only for the views. Conservation is the top priority here, with a protected lagoon teeming with marine life and a whole array of restoration projects on hand, while 375 acres of private beach and forest promise plenty of areas to get lost in. Book it: If Only offers an eight-night trip combining a four-night, full-board stay on Denis Private Island with four nights at Carana Beach Hotel on Mahé (B&B) from £2,659, including flights, transfers and a starlit dinner at the latter. ifonly.net


6


PITON DE LA FOURNAISE, REUNION ISLAND


For clients in search of something a little different, suggest Reunion Island, where the wealth of natural stunners includes Piton de la Fournaise, a dramatic, highly active volcano that erupts an average of once every nine months. Dating back around 500,000 years, it combines marble-like rock faces and jagged craters with fertile forest – an educational trail in the Enclos Fouqué caldera takes visitors to see the best of its moon-like landscapes. Book it: Hayes & Jarvis offers a seven-night holiday to Reunion Island from £1,599 per person, including seven nights at the five-star Lux Saint Gilles on a bed-and-breakfast basis and flights. hayesandjarvis.co.uk


40


19 MARCH 2020


travelweekly.co.uk


PICTURES: Arno Drexler; Shutterstock


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