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Continued from page 26


Figure D: ACEA High Ash Categories


Figure F: Conflicting Requirements for New Lubricants


Figure E: ACEA Mid SAPS Categories


Future Challenges Facing ACEA Light Duty Oil Sequences:


As discussed above, the tightening regulations for lowering CO2


emissions in light duty passenger cars


requires lubricants with high performance capability to ensure that oils can protect the engines throughout the extended service intervals. The excessive increase in performance level of new lubricants narrows the window of formulation more and more and leads to more exotic oil formulations with expensive base oils and additive technologies. To keep up with these requirements and the increasing pressures for lowering cost of ownership to the customers, oil formulators must be creative since these demands are conflicting with each other, as shown in Fig (F) below. This drives the new European lubricants to be part of the engine system design where oil specification and formulation go hand in hand with hardware design and development.


28 LUBE MAGAZINE NO.165 OCTOBER 2021


Another challenge facing ACEA Sequences is the availability of the hardware to maintain current tests in ACEA sequences. ACEA had to remove a couple of tests from 2021 sequences to avoid suspending claims during the life cycle of the newly released sequences and had to use more tests developed by API and JASO to cover the gap in gasoline requirements. This can’t be a solution for diesel tests as ACEA is the only oil standards that cover light duty diesel. We also see this being a challenge, especially for performance tests needed to cover future requirements that address new failure modes associated with new technology hardware and applications. A good example is the hybrid application where in battery operation modes, used oils will be sitting in the sump degrading due to contamination with water, condesed combustion byproducts, unburnt fuel and wear debris leading to acid and sludge formation and casuing engine durability issues. A need for such a test has been identified, and is waiting for hardware sponsor to develop a test to be part of future ACEA requirements.


Keeping up with the development of the ACEA oil standards is the way forward for a successful lubricant business. In that respect, Petronas Lubricants International has been keeping a close eye on the development of the newly released LD sequence and are one of the first lubricants manufacturers to release a new range of Syntium series for PCMO to meet the requirements of ACEA 2021 LD.


LINK www.pli-petronas.com


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