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Many are aware of Jungian theory and the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. However, most people don’t realize that each of the 16 personality types makes decisions in the same way. Each type in the world processes information in the same manner as others in the same type. That’s not to say we all do the same things within each type; one may like steak while another likes chicken. But the way each person decides what to like is identical within a type. Armed with this knowledge, we know exactly what direction the student will travel when subjected to an emergency procedure or routine oral evaluation. In the case of emergency procedures, we are able to allow the student more room to correct the error and expand the training envelope because we have a high probability of predicting their reaction.


Everyone is aware of these patterns. We see people doing things every day that are different from our own methods, unaware that it is purposeful and every bit as normal as how we are functioning. When we learn the patterns of our students, we can tailor the communications, environment, and scenario to fit the way their brain processes information. The student will understand precisely what is expected, master tasks faster, and avoid costly errors or incidents.


Whether it be in flight instruction, education, or personal relationships, everyone has encountered a personality they considered difficult, calm, quirky, or weird. And often – as instructors, parents, or partners – we see that behavior as incorrect,


as needing to be changed because it seems abnormal to us. When we begin to see people through the lens of their cognitive functions, it is much easier to understand and appreciate their behavior. Their behavior is the way they manage and navigate through life, and it’s every bit as normal as our way. Take a step further, and we can create stronger teams and relationships when we accept the differences and see traits as strengths.


It is impossible for me to see the world like any other type but my own; I am quite literally missing out on 15 other perspectives. My favorite thing to do when a student asks, “How should I do it?” is to sit back and let them show me a new way I’d never considered. Their way is not always the best way, but it always provides a roadmap of how their brain is operating and how I can connect with them on a deeper level. This is not to suggest that we change the “task, condition, or standards” of a maneuver. Rather, we can begin talking and presenting in a manner that supports the student’s preferences. By doing this, we can keep them in a constant state of understanding while using the tools easiest for them. You’ll find that it’s far less about teaching and more about allowing the student to teach themselves through experiences that energize their brain.


A simple example is our use of details:


• Say to Student A, “See that field at two o’clock? Intercept a normal approach angle, terminating at the farthest 1/3 of the


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July/Aug 2020


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