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MY2 CENTS


And he did. He wasn’t ready to hang up the headset once the problem had been identified.


As for Harrison Ford? My personal advice as a flight examiner is this. I’d tell him:


“Harrison, these infractions should serve as a wake-up call. You need to either fly with a safety pilot or take your love of flying northeast to your 800-acre ranch in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. It’s evident by your performance that you need to get out of the hectic LA and Orange County traffic. I can certainly empathize with you though. I know what it’s like to operate in the LA, Orange County, and San Diego areas because it was my stomping ground for many years. Wyoming’s quieter and shouldn’t overtax your ability to stay situationally aware. You can relax up there — and more importantly, you should be able to wear your headset for several more years to come.”


If a pilot cannot admit to himself that perhaps it’s time to hang up the headset (although, if they’re honest, they probably know deep down the time has come or is very near) then friends, fellow pilots or a flight examiner during a flight review can do a personal and public service by suggesting it may be time to make a change. If the potential danger is not addressed, silent peers or the pilot’s outright denial can lead to tragedy. It takes courage to admit to yourself that perhaps your skills are not what they used to be and to call it quits. It’s the mark of a professional to make such a tough call.


Doing so not only keeps you and others safe; your decision prevents possible heartache for loved ones you may leave behind if you make the ultimate bad decision.


Randy Mains is an author, public speaker, and AMRM consultant who works in the helicopter industry after a long career of aviation adventure. He currently serves as chief CRM/AMRM instructor for Oregon Aero.


He may be contacted at: info@randymains.com


rotorcraftpro.com


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