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Comment homecare ENVIRONMENT Editor


Tim Probert timprobert@stepcomms.com


Online Sales Executive Matthew Moore matthewmoore@stepcomms.com


Journal Administration


Katy Cockle katycockle@stepcomms.com Design


Steven Dillon Publisher


Geoff King geoffking@stepcomms.com


Publishing Director


Trevor Moon trevormoon@stepcomms.com


THE CARE HOME ENVIRONMENT is published monthly by Step Communications Ltd, Step House, North Farm Road, Tunbridge Wells, Kent TN2 3DR, UK. Tel: +44 (0)1892 779999 Fax: +44 (0)1892 616177 Email: info@thecarehomeenvironment.com Web: www.thecarehomeenvironment.com


Care sector embraces the digital revolution


There is no upside to the devastating impact of Covid-19 on care homes but if there is one positive legacy from the crisis it could be the advance of the digital revolution.


The industry has stepped up to the plate during the pandemic by enabling residents to stay in touch with loved ones remotely, with some companies offering free video calling and other technology. Many care home management software companies meanwhile have offered their services free of charge, helping staff to cope during the outbreak.


As Askham Village Community director Aliyyah-Begum Nasser says, technology such as workplace messaging apps have allowed care home managers to significantly improve their communication with staff.


This appears to be a lightbulb moment for the value of technology in care homes


“I have been able to communicate with staff I wouldn’t normally see because they work at weekends or nights, they have been messaging me directly to ask for clarity on policy or to make suggestions that we have taken on board,” she told The Care Home Environment. “It has flattened the organisation completely, which is a huge plus. That has been brilliant and something we will keep,” she added. As Person Centred Software director Jonathan Papworth and Tunstall Healthcare UK managing director Gavin Bashar write in these pages, this appears to be a lightbulb moment for the value of technology in care homes.


Arguably, there has never been a more important time to develop and invest in technology to boost resident care.


© 2020 Step Communications Ltd Single copy: £12.00 per issue. Annual journal subscription: UK £96.00 Overseas: £120.00


ISSN NO. 2398-3280


The Publisher is unable to take any responsibility for views expressed by contributors. Editorial views are not necessarily shared by the journal. Readers are expressly advised that while the contents of this publication are believed to be accurate, correct and complete, no reliance should be placed upon its contents as being applicable to any particular circumstances.


This publication is copyright under the Berne Convention and the International Copyright Convention. All rights reserved, apart from any copying under the UK Copyright Act 1956, part 1, section 7. Multiple copies of the contents of the publication without permission is always illegal.


And there is no doubt the use of technology in care homes should continue beyond the immediate Covid-19 crisis. As National Care Forum policy director Liz Jones says on page 7, digital communications can be used to ensure care homes are a part of the community, not distanced from it.


As the sector looks to rebuild from the destruction wrought by the coronavirus, that is an element that should not be overlooked. Enjoy the issue.


Tim Probert • Editor timprobert@stepcomms.com


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July 2020 • www.thecarehomeenvironment.com


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