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News Derbyshire reverses plans to close seven


homes amid new investment strategy Derbyshire County Council (DCC) has reversed the planned closure of seven care homes after it pledged no facility run by the local authority will close by 2022. A consultation on care homes had


earmarked the closure of the homes, which were placed under review after they were found by the Conservative-run DCC to be “unsound and unsafe”. The plan would have seen the reduction in


in care homes run by DCC from 23 to 16. “In the time since the start of the


consultation the world has changed, radically, with Covid-19 impacting on all parts of society and in particular the elderly and vulnerable in our communities and care homes. It is clear care homes will continue to be a central pillar of any strategy to deal with the ongoing coronavirus pandemic,” said Derbyshire County Conservative Group. If a care home is to close after the start of


2022 there will be new alternative provision to replace it, the group added. DCC will now draw a up a new five-year


investment plan and care home strategy to be consulted by the end of this year. “We are working with staff to develop a new five-year investment plan, working with the


wider care sector, to ensure DCC can offer the best, modern, fit-for-purpose care facilities to ensure elderly Derbyshire residents and dementia sufferers have the provision they deserve and need, both now and into the future,” said DCC Leader Cllr Barry Lewis. DCC meanwhile has opened a care home


ready to welcome its first residents to rest and recuperate after suffering from coronavirus. The new Ada Belfield facility in Belper,


temporarily renamed the Florence Nightingale Home, will allow those recovering from Covid- 19 to be housed in a fit-for-purpose facility to minimise risks to residents of Derbyshire care homes. Built to replace the current Ada Belfield


care site, the home will be used exclusively to accept people discharged from hospital who need to rest, recuperate and isolate after suffering from Covid-19 but are not yet ready to go home.


The 40-bed unit, set over two floors, is built


on the site of a former Thornton’s factory site. Plans to open it as a conventional care


home are currently on hold. For now, the home will open with ten beds, with the potential to expand to 20. The care centre is part of a larger £10m development that includes a new library.


Angela Swift swoops to file plans for


71-bed development in Carlisle Harrogate outfit Angela Swift Developments has filed plans with Carlisle City Council to build a 71-bed care home on the site of a former home that closed last year. The £7m development, located around two


miles to the south-west of Carlisle city centre in Morton, would replace the council-run, 44-bed Langrigg House. Angela Swift proposes to build a three-story care home that incorporates residential and


dementia facilities with 23 bedrooms on the ground floor, 30 bedrooms on the first floor and 18 on the second floor. Communal facilities planned for the


development include cinema space, hairdresser, treatment room, library, coffee shop, activity rooms, private dining room and landscaped gardens. If approved, each wing would feature a large bathroom, designed to feel like a spa while being


fully accessible to all guests "to add a sense of luxury to the building", the developer said. Angela Swift anticipates the development,


planned to open in spring 2022, would create up to 70 full-time and part-time jobs.


Qualifications in Activity Provision


It is increasingly recognised that Activity Provision can make a signifi cant contribution to well-being and quality of life, and the Care Sector reports a need for specialist training for their staff in this area. NAPA is delighted to offer two courses that meet the needs of the specialist activity workforce.


NAPA off ers: Level 2 Award in Supporting Activity Provision in Social Care (QCF) accredited by OCN London


This knowledge only course is provided through distance learning with telephone tutor support.


Level 3 Certifi cate in Activity Provision in Social Care (QCF) accredited by OCN London This higher level course is knowledge and competence based. The student will be supported throughout this distance learning course to research the assignments, write narrative comparisons and evaluate their day to day work.


For further information please visit our website www.napa-activities.co.uk


July 2020 • www.thecarehomeenvironment.com 11


McCarthy & Stone places final brick in assets sale to Waverstone


Retirement living developer McCarthy & Stone has completed the sale of 135 units to Waverstone LLP for £35m. The portfolio consists of 41 show flats and sales offices with a subsequent 12- month leaseback, and the sale of 94 finished apartments and apartments under construction in Scotland. The sale of these 94 apartments


completes the group's strategy to exit its development activity from Scotland. McCarthy & Stone will receive £13m cash on completion with the remaining £22m balance expected to be paid over the next three years. The transaction is expected to generate


anet profit of c.£3m over a three-year period.


McCarthy & Stone said the sale forms


part of the Covid-19 cash optimisation measures to ensure that the Group has around two and a half years of cash cover.


I have grown in confidence through the NAPA course.


The course has certainly made a difference to the


provision in our home.


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