search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
WORK FORCE I S SUE S


Moving from a blame culture to a just culture


As highlighted by NHS England with the NHS People Plan1 , healthcare


organisations that prioritise workforce wellbeing will be better placed to put lessons learnt from the coronavirus pandemic into practice. Phil Taylor outlines the benefits of introducing a just culture not a blame culture and shares a methodology for positive change.


Towards the end of 2019, nearly 600,000 NHS employees from 300 NHS organisations, including 229 NHS Trusts, took part in what is considered to be one of the largest workforce surveys in the world and the results were enlightening. When it comes to staff wellbeing, 40.3% of respondents reported feeling unwell as a result of work-related stress, a steady increase over the previous three years; 56.6% admitted to going into work despite not feeling well enough to perform their duties.2


These statistics are alarming,


particularly when you consider they were revealed before the arrival of COVID-19, a hitherto unknown enemy that has shaken and tested the healthcare sector to its very core.


COVID-19 – a powerful catalyst for change


Staff burnout, stress and sickness are nothing new, however. The pressures on the national healthcare system caused by the pandemic have brought them into sharp focus. While members of the public have shown their appreciation for the remarkable dedication and efforts of health and care staff throughout the crisis through the weekly ‘clap for carers’, leading institutions in the medical world are clamouring for action and, in our opinion, COVID-19 can prove to be a powerful and beneficial catalyst for change. A statement published by the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges on behalf of the British Medical Association, NHS Confederation, NHS Providers, Royal College of Nursing and UNISON, calls for better working conditions. These centre on the five key issues of ‘ensuing the wellbeing of the workforce’, ‘flexible working arrangements and at work facilities’, ‘increasing the supply of workforce’, ‘new ways of delivering care’


SEPTEMBER 2020


and ‘leadership’.3


It is interesting to note that


‘ensuring the wellbeing of the workforce’ features top of the list and healthcare organisations should make this their top priority to manage the next stage of the pandemic effectively.


Investigating the root cause of staff stress


Like all problems, the key to tackling them successfully is to first establish what caused them in the first place. Similar to many fast-changing industries where staff have a critical role to play, lack of involvement in decision-making and having responsibility, without authority or autonomy, are common


stress factors. Apply this general truth to managing COVID-19 and it’s easy to see how stress levels can quickly escalate out of control. Leaders were in the invidious position of having to take fast decisions around PPE, ventilators and new contagion measures; doctors, nurses and care home staff were struggling to save lives while implementing these new procedures with very little warning, autonomy, or ability to feedback.


In a sector where a blame culture has been evidenced, the greatest stressor for staff, especially during a healthcare crisis like coronavirus, is: What will happen to me if something goes wrong? Poor culture


WWW.CLINICALSERVICESJOURNAL.COM l 83





©Syda Productions - stock.adobe.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92