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SPONSORED BY HEALTH SECTOR NEWS


Website ‘to help inspire next generation of diverse engineers’


Accessing some of the latest thinking and evidence of what works to encourage young people from diverse backgrounds to consider engineering as a career ‘will be much easier’ with the launch of the new Tomorrow’s Engineers website developed by EngineeringUK, the organisation says. Tomorrow’s Engineers ‘brings together free advice and guidance, curated from across the engineering community, to support practitioners in providing young people with engineering careers inspiration’. The website includes the latest thinking on topics ranging from how to run virtual events and ‘top tips’ for ensuring an inclusive approach, to how to survey young people and improve engaging outreach activities. Dr Hilary Leevers, CEO of


EngineeringUK, said: “EngineeringUK’s mission is to support the wider engineering community in inspiring the next generation of engineers to understand the thousands of future engineering roles available – from infrastructure, to helping the UK achieve its Net Zero aspirations, to working alongside scientists and healthcare specialists to deliver vaccines to combat coronavirus. We know young people’s educational and career aspirations have already been


MAT delivers theatres for


Queen’s Hospital treatment centre


affected by the pandemic, so it’s more important than ever to get this type of outreach activity right. That’s why we’ve refreshed Tomorrow’s Engineers to provide resources to help practitioners illustrate that engineering can give young people the opportunities they need and want – careers with enormous societal value.


“We want the site to provide a hub for everyone who funds, designs, or delivers, engineering engagement activity to share their learnings on how best, together, to achieve the collective impact needed to increase the number and diversity of young people entering engineering careers.”


STEM community practitioners are encouraged to recommend resources for inclusion on the website. Visit https://www.tomorrowsengineers.org.uk/ working-together


Gradus ‘bespoke’ wall protection for Grange University Hospital


Contract interior specialist, Gradus, has designed and installed bespoke wall protection with a printed finish at the new £350 m Grange University Hospital in Llanfrechfa, Cwmbran.


Gradus says the ‘custom solution’, an example of its SureProtect Design wall cladding, ‘creates a positive healing environment, while protecting the building from damage and reducing long- term expenditure on maintenance, repair, and refurbishment’. Its wall protection products have been fitted throughout the hospital, which has 2,612 rooms, and offers over 40 specialist services. The SureProtect Design wall cladding – with ‘a stunning range of designs’ that are


different on each floor – is the result of a supply and fit service that saw the Gradus dedicated contracts team carry the project from initial survey, through design and manufacture, to installation. SureProtect Design has an ‘easy-to-clean’ surface, with the design printed on the back of the clear textured sheet, which protects it, and ‘helps create a robust environment’.


Hannah Capel, Senior Programme manager at the Grange University Hospital, said: “The Gradus wall protection provides a hygienic solution, and the wonderful designs create a less institutional, more relaxing environment for our patients. Gradus worked very closely with us to realise the look we were after, and we are delighted with the finished design.” Gradus also fitted other wall protection products, including SureProtect Endure wall cladding, to protect against impact and abrasion; high-impact corner guards at vulnerable corners; wall guards and strips, and bedhead protectors to protect vital medical equipment.


24 Health Estate Journal February 2021


The treatment centre houses two MAT ECO-flow ultraclean ventilation (UCV) operating theatres, a 28-bedded ward, and an outpatient suite for orthopaedics, urology, and breast services. MAT’s work in the theatres and recovery area encompassed all M&E services and a full fit-out, featuring ECO-flow UCV canopies, operating theatre lights, PACS, theatre panels, and IPS/UPS equipment. This turnkey scheme was one of many MAT has completed at Queen’s Hospital Burton. Sister company, MAT FM, holds the service and maintenance contract for all the hospital’s UCV operating theatres.


Delivered via a screened or screenless canopy over the theatre clean zone, the MAT ultraclean ventilation system provides a method of diluting air to the level required in HTM 03-01, Specialised Ventilation for Healthcare Premises. Air is discharged above the operating zone, its downward displacement purging the clean zone of any contaminants and particles generated within it. The airflow in and around the clean zone also prevents particles from outside the zone from entering (entrainment).


Medical Air Technology (MAT) says it is proud to have been part of the team that delivered the new £25 m treatment centre for Queen’s Hospital Burton, installing two ultraclean operating theatres as part of the facilities for orthopaedic surgery.


The biggest development the hospital has seen in 15 years, the three-storey treatment centre was built by Catfoss using modular construction. Linked to the main hospital via a corridor, the self-contained extension means patients can be treated either in the main hospital or the centre, which now contain all the inpatient services once spread around the site in smaller, older buildings.


©EngineeringUK


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