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CONDUCTIVE PLASTICS 2018 | EVENT PREVIEW conductive plastics Exploring


Smart devices and safety-critical electronics are driving interest in polymer compounds offering enhanced electrical and thermal conductivity. Conductive Plastics 2018 explores the enabling technologies and potential opportunities


Main image: Polymer compounds that offer enhanced thermal and electrical conductivity could find applications as varied as heat exchangers to smart sensors


The increasing penetration of electronics into today’s industrial and consumer products, together with the emergence of critical application sectors such as autonomous vehicles, is driving demand for enclosures that can eliminate the risk of signal interference while protecting sensitive electronic components and dissipating heat. Meanwhile, traditional applications for conductive polymer applications, such as ATEX and ESD products and trace heating, could extend to include heat exchang- ers and decorative surfaces with optimised haptics. AMI’s third European Conductive Plastics 2018


conference, which takes place in Vienna in Austria on 6-7 November, explores the latest developments in additive and compounding technologies that will enable the production of electrically and/or thermally conductive plastics compounds capable of meeting these demanding new requirements. With automotive a key potential market for conductive plastics, the conference will open with a presentation by Dr Tamim P Sidiki, Global Market- ing Director at DSM Engineering Plastics in the Netherlands, who will identify some of the key upcoming application areas. He will be followed by Klaus Rathberger, Managing Director of Georg H Lüh in Germany, who will discuss carbon-based additives ranging from graphite to graphene. Then


86 COMPOUNDING WORLD | October 2018


Seçil Yilancioğlu, R&D Manager at Eurotec Engineering Plastics in Turkey, will talk through the performance of some electrically and thermally conductive PA materials. The focus then turns to electrically conductive additives. Michael Claes, Chief Technology Officer and Global Strategic Account Manager at Nanocyl in Belgium, will detail its work on creating cost- optimised compounds using multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Dr Christian Maus, Devel- opment and Support Leader at OCSiAl in Luxem- bourg, will explain how its single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be used in thermoplastic compounds. And Tom Daniels, Market Manager Conductive Plastics at Bekaert in Belgium will discuss the use of its stainless steel fibres products. Moving on to thermally conductive additives, Dr


Stefanie Wildhack, Senior Specialist Product and Application Development at 3M Technical Ceram- ics in Germany, will cover the latest experience with its boron nitride filler products.Dr Carsten Ihmels, Head of Department R&D at Nabaltec in Germany, will cover the use of mineral FR fillers and metal oxides to enhance thermal conductivity. Péter Sebö, Head of Marketing & Market Development at Quarzwerke in Germany, will cover fillers for white and colourable applications. And Dr Bashar Diar


www.compoundingworld.com


PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK


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