search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
MATERIALS | 3D PRINT COMPOUNDS


Right: AIMPLAS researchers are investigating the use of 3D print


technologies in areas such as sensors, short run moulds and conductive compounds


although this is more difficult to solve from a compounding perspective. However, he says rheological issues have not yet been considered sufficiently by the 3D print industry.


Right: Filaments are the most popular 3D print option today, offering low equipment cost and easy material customisation


Strong interest NatureWorks launched its first compounded 3D print grade – Ingeo 3D870 - in February last year and since then reports strong industry interest. “A number of filament companies have their own modified or compounded solutions, but many have found this grade to combine the printability they are accustomed to with our 3D850 base 3D grade with substantially improved impact perfor- mance on a par with ABS,” says Dan Sawyer, Global Leader, New Business Segment. “In addition, when parts are annealed, impact performance exceeding that of ABS and greatly improved heat resistance can be achieved. Users are surprised at the combination of impact and clarity with parts printed from 3D870. We are really seeing rapid growth stemming from what some are calling the professional desktop user market, meaning users who print in the work environment, but with a printer in the $2,500-$20,000 range. These users prioritise print performance and reliability over unique colours or effects in the raw material and we feel that it is a great fit for our compounded 3D870 and even 3D850, which is being used increasingly in industrial markets like investment metal casting and in anatomical models,” he says. “The industrialisation that is now happening with printers in a more moderate price range than the traditional industrial 3D printers has been something to take note of. Applications like metal casting, jigs and fixtures for manufacturing or medical models will each have their unique perfor-


64 COMPOUNDING WORLD | October 2018


mance requirements and those are more critical in such an industrial application,” he says. “These applications of 3D printing are all about saving time and money in a particular industry so things like break-away support materials or better fusing and finishing grades are areas we are looking at to go further with compounded products.” Sawyer says that one particular area where new compounding solutions are needed is for increas- ingly complex and larger parts where support materials will allow users to build over them. Other technical areas of interest include the need for a tougher than general-purpose PLA with impact performance for applications such as jigs and fixtures for manufacturing (although NatureWorks says that Ingeo 3D870 goes a long way towards addressing this for a wide range of applications). Sawyer says the company is in the late stages of developing and testing a grade formulated specifically for this application. “We hope to bring the new breakaway support material to market very soon. Another area we have been working on is a recycled 3D grade. In fact, the podium used at our recent Innovation Takes Root conference used post- industrial recycled material and we are continuing to determine if post-consumer scrap could be incorporated into this grade.”


Fixture application Slant3D – a large printing service bureau – recently showed examples of fixtures produced from 3D870 where it was possible to leverage the improved performance in a more demanding application, says Sawyer. “We are working with some of the initial adoptees of this grade to expand on this and add to our collection of case studies,” he says. “We are also aware of a case study put out by Ultimaker, where Volkswagen used Ultimaker printers and a formulated version of PLA to produce fixtures used in manufacturing automobiles in their Portuguese factory. The tool was a template used in putting the wheels on the cars without scuffing the rims of the car with automated tooling. Users in these industrial


www.compoundingworld.com


PHOTO: AIMPLAS


PHOTO: AIMPLAS


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94