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ADDITIVES | REINFORCEMENT


Cross sections


Round cross section chopped strands


Eliptical cross section chopped strands


Figure 1: Images showing warpage in two edge-gated square test plaques (approx 170mm by 170mm by 2.2mm), moulded in PA66 30% reinforced with round and flat fibres respectively. Test bars (80 mm by 25 mm) were cut from the centres of the plaques in the flow and transverse directions and tested for flexural strength. Flexural strength in round fibre-reinforced test bars cut in the flow direction was 1.7 times higher than in bars cut in the transverse direction, while the ratio in test bars moulded with flat fibres was much lower, at 1.2. Source: Nippon Electric Glass


16 14 12 10 8 6 4


420 410 390 380 370 360 350 340 330 320


Warpage tests


incremental capacity increase is planned for the Malaysia location.


Flat innovation NEG has also strengthened its global research operations with a new R&D building opened early this year at Notogawa in Japan. One of the most recent results of its research activities is the development of a “flat” glass fibre for thermoplas- tics. The products, which are more elliptical than flat, are currently produced on a pilot line in Notogawa, but den Besten says NEG it will scale up soon to a larger capacity. Products are available for various polymers, including PA, PP, PBT, and PPS. “The main advantages for flat glass fibre are


reduced warp, higher flow and better surface quality of moulded products, but it also shows very promising mechanical properties at higher glass contents,” den Besten says (see Figures 1 and 2). In the US, NEG has launched an improved


30 40 50 G.C. (%) 60


roving for long fibre-reinforced PP. TufRov 4520 is said to show improved processing with very low fuzz, while mechanical properties are claimed to be better than existing LFT rovings for this segment. The company is now considering marketing it in Europe. Also for the LFT segment, it has introduced a roving for food compliant polyamides. TufRov 4515 is said to show good processing performance while meeting all requirements for latest European Food compliance standards. In the chopped strand segment, NEG says demand for higher performance in a number of thermoplastic polymers can be met with products based on a modified glass composition. It now offers several chopped strands based on its Innofib- er XM technology, which was originally developed for the wind energy segment but is now offered for PA and PBT with a grade for PP in the offing. Other chopped strand products launched in


Europe for the thermoplastics segment include ChopVantage HP 3720, designed for PBT and PET compounds requiring food contact compliance, and ChopVantage HP 3293 and HP 3290 (13 and 10µm diameter respectively), developed for improved performance in products coming into contact with hot detergents. Further products are set for introduction next year.


Den Besten says NEG has also decided to 30 40 50 G.C. (%)


Figure 2: Comparison of impact strength and fibre length retention of PA66 reinforced with conventional round glass fibres (red) and flat glass fibres (blue) Source: Nippon Electric Glass


78 COMPOUNDING WORLD | October 2018 60


support global customers by producing traditional Asian “T” products in Europe and the US as well. “We are also transferring HP products to Malaysia,” he says. “NEG will continue to invest in capacity in all regions in the world and we will continue to develop new products to meet new requirements from our customers.”


www.compoundingworld.com


Fibre length in reinforcement, mm


Charpy impact strength, kJ/m2


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