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MATERIALS | 3D PRINT COMPOUNDS


Right: This complex-


shaped shock absorber was manufactured using three different 3D printing


technologies in PC, TPU and PU from Covestro


tion development can be more efficient using these filaments in prototypes, as the same base resin materials are available in injection moulding grades for production. Ultem AMHU1010F filament is a polyetherimide


(PEI) product, manufactured from Ultem HU1010 healthcare-grade resin that provides inherent high-heat resistance. Printed parts can be sterilised using gamma radiation, ethylene oxide (EtO) or steam autoclaving. It is UL94 V-0 compliant at 1.5mm and 5VA compliant at 3.0mm. Lexan AMHC620F polycarbonate (PC) filament, available in white, is also biocompatible and can be steri- lised with gamma or EtO methods. This filament meets UL94 HB rating at 1.5mm. The company says that both the new healthcare filaments deliver good mechanical performance. They are suitable for a wide variety of medical device applications, from conceptual modelling to functional prototyping and end-use parts. Possible customised or personalised applications include surgical instruments, single-use devices and casts/splints.


PEEK performance PEEK polymer manufacturer


Victrex is preparing newly developed materials for additive manufacturing (AM). The first of these is a high strength material for laser sintering which attains lower


Above: SABIC is targeting its new Ultem and Lexan-based filament materials at applications in the healthcare sector


refresh rates, resulting in improved recycling of unsintered powder. The second is a filament with better Z-strength than existing polyaryletherketone (PAEK) materials. The company says that incumbent PAEK materials


currently on the market, although used in some AM applications, are designed for conventional manu- facturing methods, such as machining and injection moulding. As a result, they are not optimal for AM processes. First generation PAEK materials for laser sintering, for example, can only be recycled to a minimal extent, requiring near full refresh- ment of the printing bed with new powder. And similar PEEK filaments for filament fusion displayed relatively poor interlayer bond- ing, leading to a loss in Z-strength. The newly developed Victrex grades overcome both chal- lenges. “Breakthrough technology is paving the way for an exciting


70 COMPOUNDING WORLD | October 2018


future for additive manufacturing in PAEK. The powder recycle work for laser sintering, using the new Victrex development polymer grades, has gone very well with no measurable loss of proper- ties when test components were made from partially recycled powder. We believe it will be possible to re-use all of the non-sintered powder that is recovered after a build run. This will result in a significant reduction in material costs compared to current PAEKmaterials where up to 40% of the polymer is wasted and cannot be recycled,” says John Grasmeder, Chief Scientist at Victrex. Victrex is also leading a consortium funded by


the UK’s agency for innovation, Innovate UK, to carry out intensive research and development to advance AM technologies. This focuses in particular on high-temperature, affordable polymer compos- ites for AM aerospace applications. Other members of the consortium include Airbus Group Innova- tions, EOS, University of Exeter Center for Additive Layer Manufacturing, E3D-Online, HiETA Technolo- gies, South West Metal Finishing, and 3T-RPD.


Victrex PAEK


materials are used in this


optimised bio-mi- metic bracket, developed with 3T-RPD


Industrial focus Eastman has introduced Amphora SP1621 3D polymer - its first powder-based material for industrial 3D printing. Amphora SP1621 powder will be manufactured in collaboration with Advanced Laser Materials (ALM), a company specialising in material research, development and consulta- tion for industrial 3D printing. Eastman says that Amphora SP1621 is an advanced, production- ready material for laser sintering. It is a high-perform-


www.compoundingworld.com


PHOTO: SABIC


PHOTO: 3T-RPD


PHOTO: COVESTRO


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