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WE REALLY DO MEAN


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Stockton Unified School District in California utilized grants for charging infrastructure and electric vehicles. The district acquired a fleet of 11 electric buses and had 24 charging stations installed in less than a year.


“We started with 16 [buses] on a grant, and we’ve been getting grants ever


since,” Shannon commented on the district’s electric fleet. “Grant funding made it very economical to switch to electric.” Twin Rivers has received various grants from the California Energy Com-


mission, from CARB through its hybrid voucher incentive program and Carl Moyer Program, the local air quality management district, and the Sacra- mento Municipal Utility District (SMUD). In addition to grants, Twin Rivers helps make cleaner fuels financially viable through partnerships and savings on fueling for its 37 buses running on renewable diesel, 31 on compressed and renewable natural gas and three using unleaded gasoline. The district has “a really sweet deal” with the regional transit authority to


fuel its CNG buses at a shared station. It also has an agreement with UPS to use the company’s fuel station as a backup. In the past, the district had its own CNG fueling, Shannon explained, but it turned out to be “a nightmare in repairs once it got to a certain age.” “With CNG, I’d recommend partnering with a company (or other en-


tity) that already has CNG offered,” he added, noting that environmental concerns around fuel stations and other issues make acquiring CNG infra- structure much more complicated than electric. Shannon said that renewable diesel—made from waste fats and oils—costs


about 15 percent less than conventional diesel and results in savings on main- tenance, since the diesel particulated traps burned soot less often. The district has been using CNG buses for two decades, Shannon said,


and renewable diesel for the past two years. “It’s a transition for us,” Shannon said. “All the combustion fuels will be phasing out at Twin Rivers.” The district also plans to start accessing LCFS credits, and is working on a


revenue-sharing deal with SMUD. “It’s really a no-brainer,” said Shannon of transitioning to electric. “You just have to go out and make it happen.”


More Propane and Renewable Diesel For the Beaufort County School District in South Carolina, the Volkswagen


Mitigation Trust Fund settlement administered by the state has been key to greening the fleet and saving money, resulting in 18 propane buses with


www.stnonline.com 39


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With radiators, DPFs, EGRs and more than 30,000 exhaust parts, it’s no wonder Auto-jet is the choice of school bus systems coast to coast.


John Rapp President


PHOTO COURTESY OF STOCKTON USD


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