search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Dashcam video captures a motorist illegally passing a Kanawha County Schools bus in West Virginia.


Public Safety Enemy No. 1


Illegal passing remains a persistent and baffling problem. Can it be solved anytime soon?


Written by Eric Woolson I


f there’s one thing that most pupil transportation professionals agree on, hands down, it’s that illegal passing is the industry’s number-one safety threat. “Everyone in pupil transportation has the same


theory,” said Brette Fraley, director of transportation for Kanawha County Schools in West Virginia, which includes the state capital of Charleston. “I get really upset when someone passes a stopped bus. Bus drivers get very upset about it because they take ownership of those students and their safety.” Technology is attempting to turn the tide, or at least


provide students and school bus drivers with an alert that an illegal pass is about to occur. For instance, Safe Fleet’s


44 School Transportation News • APRIL 2020


predictive stop-arm solution uses radar to determine if a motorist will illegally pass the school bus, and it sounds an audible and visual alarm. Zonar and BusPatrol now partner on the SafeTek Student and SafeTech Complete solutions, which combine video camera enforcement with student visability and fleet management tools. Fraley said it baffles him how a motorist can miss a school bus, in the first place. “It’s 40 feet long. It’s yellow. It has flashing lights. I cannot imagine people can’t see it.” Julie Nemmers, director of transportation at Spencer


(Iowa) Community Schools District, echoed that senti- ment. “What don’t you see? It’s a big yellow metal tank


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60