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behavior, driver oversight and background checks, stop-arm violations, quality of maintenance and repairs, and parent behavior at stops. One rural district director, who asked not to be


identified, expressed concern that the district does not have an emergency response plan that includes transportation. “We’re rural but you don’t know what’s out there,” the director said. “We’ve got a good plan for buildings, but it doesn’t address anything that might happen on a school bus. We report suspicious activity, but it’s nothing we’ve had any formal training on, or what procedures to follow if there is something suspi- cious going on.” Paramount to any emergency response plan is a


central figure, who not only declares the school dis- trict is in crisis mode but also directs all the players and who all the developing information is funneled through. Just as important are the people who serve on the committee that develops the plan. The com- position of the committee and who pulls the trigger


on the plan can vary from district to district. Salliejo Evers, the director of campus safety,


security, risk management and transportation for Spokane Public Schools in Washington state, said crisis response planning should be all inclusive. “Just as the most effective security systems rely on


full integration, so does planning for emergencies, crises and significant events,” said Evers, who joined the district in February from the American Red Cross. “When we plan for an emergency response, we bring together risk management, safety, secu- rity, local law enforcement and fire, transportation, district and building-level administration, and other key representatives to be sure the plan is functional, realistic and will actually work as intended. The goal is to keep our students safe in a fluid and dynamic situation.” Evers added that transportation is key, since there


will almost always be a need to move students, per- sonnel and even shelter within or near buses. “The


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