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CURRICULUM RACE IN THE MEDIA BACKGROUND


This lesson challenges members of the school community to frame teaching and learning as acts for equity, well-being and achievement.


This lesson requires students, educators and other members of the school community to co- create safe and brave spaces where:


• Discussions are centred on privilege and oppression.


• Shifts in attitudes and beliefs for equity and well-being are nurtured.


• Critical inquiries around identity, allyship and power are fostered.


Race in the Media is a lesson for junior students that asks them to critically examine how bias is perpetuated in the media. This excerpt is part of a set of broader lessons that serve as an extension of the White Privilege booklet (available through ShopETFO.) These lesson plans are available free online to members. To access the rest, email your name, ETFO number and a non-school board Outlook email account to: wpriv@etfo.org. Your email account will serve as your username for the download site in our ETFO secure website. If you do not have an Outlook account, you can sign up for one at signup.live.com.


Prior to this lesson, review the Glossary section as well as ETFO’s Re-Think, Re-Connect, Re- Imagine: Thinking about ourselves, our schools, our communities. Refl ecting on White privilege resource. Members of the school community are urged to refl ect on their own wonderings and engage in inquiries for equitable and inclusive communities.


LEARNING GOALS At the end of this lesson, students will be able to: •


Identify bias found in the news.


• Critically investigate language used in the news to describe different racial groups.


• Explore the importance of allyship in equity work.


• Set goals for their own equity work.


INQUIRY GOALS I wonder…


• How my students are understanding different racial (and other identity) groups and their portrayal in the news.


• How my students understand the way language is used to communicate particular images of different racial (and other identity) groups on the news.


• How my students understand the experiences and identities of all races and identities and how they can be honoured in various news outlets.


CALL FOR ACTION


Students will create a one-minute news clip for the school community that:


• Highlights the diverse experiences of First Na- tions, Métis and Inuit, and racialized Peoples across Canada.


• Honours the diverse identities found across the country.


• Inspires others to act as allies.


CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS Grade 4/5/6 Language: Writing, Reading, Oral Communication, Media, Visual Arts, Social Studies, Mathematics: Data Management and Probability Materials


SUGGESTED PRIOR KNOWLEDGE


• This lesson focuses on First Nations, Métis and Inuit Peoples’ content. Prior discussions and learnings about historical/contemporary contributions and issues/contexts would be ideal (e.g., key First Nations, Métis and Inuit fi gures in Canada, residential schools, pre/ post-contact events, etc.).


• Equity-related and identities language such as racialized, privilege, marginalized, equity, equality are familiar terms for students that can deepen this learning experience.


• Previous experiences on unpacking bias in media would be an asset. Lessons in media literacy would be helpful.


38 ETFO VOICE | SPRING 2019 TFO VOICE | SPRING 2019


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