search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
BY TANYA MURRAY T


here is something transforma- tional about teaching and learn- ing outside, and not just when the sun is shining and the breeze is warm but in all weather. Standing


in a circle, feeling a light rain on your cheeks as members of the group welcome one other, ac- knowledging the land and all the potential for your time there together, these are opportuni- ties to recognize land not as something to be managed, to take from, but as a friend to con- nect with, a partner in a reciprocal relation- ship. Nature-rich spaces need not involve a bus ride or an overnight excursion; authentic out- door learning can happen right in our back- yards, our schoolyards and our local parks (to use the term coined by Jacob Rodenburg, our ‘neighbourwoods’). The chickadees, sidewalk cracks and newly-planted oak trees are waiting for us to uncover rich-learning opportunities.


WHY OUTDOOR LEARNING?


There is a growing cultural and educational movement toward nature-based education and inquiry as a way to create powerful learn- ing experiences with and for our students. The National Wildlife Federation (2014) states “our kids are out of shape, tuned out and stressed out, because they’re missing something essen- tial to their health and development: connec- tion to the natural world.” Research shows that when we foster a child’s connection to nature, we reduce stress and increase patience, self- discipline, capacity for attention and recovery from mental fatigue, crisis or psychophysi- ological imbalance (Russell et al., 2013, p. 482). We are at a critical moment in time when


we need more sustainable ways of being in this world. As we commit to reconciling our rela- tionships with land, people and place, we need to intentionally set the stage for helping to nur- ture caring, environmental citizens. Today, the average child can identify over


300 corporate logos, but only 10 native plants or animals. One could say the same for adults. In 2007, an updated edition of the Oxford Junior Dictionary was released, and environ- mentalists quickly noticed common nature words had been dropped and replaced with those that were more technology-focused, one of many signs of the growing disconnect between childhood and the natural world.


E ELEMENTARY TEACHERS’ FEDERATION OF ONTARIO 29


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52