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The Team


Editorial Editor Martin Wharmby martin@opusbm.co.uk


Advertising Account Director Clare Gapp clare@opusbm.co.uk


Area Manager Damian Murphy damian@opusbm.co.uk


Production Production Director Hannah Wilkinson hannah@opusbm.co.uk


Designer Daniel Etheridge daniel@opusbm.co.uk


Designer Nigel Rice nigel@opusbm.co.uk


CEO Mark Hanson mark@opusbm.co.uk


‘Normality’ seems to be on everyone’s lips these days. We’re all just trying to


get back to a sense of it, back to the good old days of social interaction, getting back to the office, sending the kids back to school and getting back into the


rhythm of daily life where you didn’t have to be concerned about R numbers or getting too close to someone in the fruit and veg aisle in Aldi.


But ‘normality’ is gone, and isn’t likely to be coming back until science can offer up true Coronavirus solutions. Shops, restaurants and pubs opening again


seems to have triggered a sense that you don’t need to be so careful anymore, and that an ‘all clear’ is just around the corner. There’s a naivety and ignorance to the sentiment that we’re all getting ‘back to normal’ now that belies the threat that the virus still carries.


Visit any supermarket and you’ll see people ignoring mask-wearing rules and going unchallenged, social distancing is widely being flouted, and hand sanitising is seen as optional (when it’s actually available). Look at how tens of


thousands of people flocked to the beaches, or packed out beauty spots with a rarely-seen fervour during the heatwave. Confused, unclear and unconvincing Government guides haven’t helped, and as a result, we’re seeing more and more local lockdowns.


Despite the cleaning industry’s best efforts to protect us and limit dangers


as the economy reopens, all the precautions in the world can’t help if people are under the impression that these measures are just optional. ‘Normality’


Registered in England & Wales No: 06786728 Opus Business Media Ltd Zurich House, Hulley Road, Macclesfield, Cheshire SK10 2SF


Email: info@opusbm.co.uk Tel: 01625 426054 ISSN 2055-4761


www.tomorrowscleaning.com This publication is copyright Opus Business Media Ltd and may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form in whole or in part without the prior written permission of Opus Business Media Ltd. While every care has been taken during the preparation of this magazine, Opus Business Media Ltd cannot be held responsible for the accuracy of the information herein or for any consequence arising from it. The publisher does not necessarily agree with the views and opinions expressed by contributors.


4 | EDITOR’S VOICE


is just complacency, and that’s what’s leading us towards a second, deadlier COVID-19 peak this Winter.


In this month’s issue of Tomorrow’s Cleaning, we take a look at Technology and how it can improve efficiencies and help keep us safe from COVID-19. We


also investigate the changes made in cleaning for Retail settings, as well as the wider Contract Cleaning market itself. We’ve also got a closer look at how an Optician’s practice is adapting to reopening in a Case Study.


Thank you very much for reading, please stay safe and enjoy the issue!


Editor’s Voice


Martin Wharmby, Editor Official members of ISSA & CHSA


twitter.com/TomoCleaning


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