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TOOLS TO TACKLE HARD FLOORS


Paul Igo of the Preparation Group discusses the best tools and


accessories to use when refurbishing and cleaning resilient and natural wood or stone floor surfaces.


For the refurbishment and deep restorative cleaning of hard floors, there are machines on the market that are multi-tasking, such as the STG450 and lighter STG400. A wide range of attachments can be fixed or simply placed under the machine to grind, sand, key, clean or polish hard floors including resin, terrazzo, marble, stone, wood, concrete and vinyl.


adhesive residues and paint. The finer grades can be used for medium to heavy sanding of wooden floors.


Black Sanding Discs are available in 16 to 120 grit and are for light to medium sanding and grinding and will remove surface contaminants and key terrazzo tiles for overlaying.


Scrubbing Pads in Coarse, medium, fine and buff are for general cleaning operations like removing floor wax, ground-in dirt and scuff marks


Mesh Discs are available in 60-180 grit and can be used to remove and key varnish for recoating and for the final sanding of wooden floors. They will also lightly sand hard, dense materials such as epoxy coatings and screeds.


SFD’s (Surface Finishing Diamond Pads) available in 50 to 3000 grit, are for chemical-free deep cleaning, renewing surfaces and a first-time polish on hard floors. They are the only system capable of grinding, cleaning, keying, texturing, sanding and polishing the surface without clogging. The pad grades can be used in sequence as a staged polishing process.


Nylon Brush Plates scrub and clean old floors to remove surface contaminants. Nylon is flexible and so lasts longer than polypropylene equivalents. This plate can be used with cleaning products or degreasing solutions but water gives an environmentally friendly clean.


Standard Drive Plates are fixed to the STG machine to enable attachment of the following range of discs and pads:


Tungsten Carbide Copper Discs are available in 3-36 grit. The coarser grades are aggressive for the removal of old


Case study 1: Removing screed laitence


The Preparation Group’s contracting division PPC, was recently contracted to sand 3,500m2


of calcium sulphate


screed for a care home in Harrogate, to remove the surface laitance so that new tiles could be laid.


The STG450 was used, attached to a M450 vacuum for a dust free operation and fitted with a 24 grit TCT Copper disc.


The area was completed in one week, ready to receive the new tiles.


Storm Diamond Pads are double sided and available in 400 to 3000 grit for deep cleaning and maintaining previously polished smooth, hard surfaces. They remove light scratches and staining can leave a soft sheen or high gloss finish depending on the grades selected. A hygienic, shiny, yet non-slip floor on hard floors is achieved just by adding water. Again, it is a staged polishing system involving working up the grades to the desired finish.


Other plates and discs are available for heavy duty preparation work such as a complete floor renewal.


www.thepreparationgroup.com Case study 2:


Polishing concrete


The Preparation Group’s contracting division PPC, was contracted to polish a 40-metre concrete slab that was uneven and pitted, in the reception of a Lincoln University building.


After grinding it to remove the high spots, flattening and smoothing the area, the polishing process was completed with the STG450 machine fitted firstly with SFD’s, working up the grades from 100 to the finest 800 and then Storm Diamond Pads to create the final sheen, polishing the floor with just water.


38 | REFURBISHMENT www.tomorrowscontractfloors.com


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