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‘Cool Chemistry’, a Christeyns-patented innovation, combines equipment and chemistry and has been developed to deliver improved whiteness and increased disinfection over conventional chemistry but at temperatures as low as 40°C. The detergent chemistry operates at a neutral pH, in place of traditional highly alkaline chemicals, which allows less water to be used for rinsing. The neutral pH also reduces chemical damage to textiles to provide extended useable life.


Christeyns’ Dave Aveyard said: “The standard tunnel wash process has changed from 15 to 20 years ago when typically water consumption was 8-10 L/KG, now a modern wash process can be reduced to consumption as low as 2L/ KG.


“Water captured from the main wash can be filtered and redirected to use in pre-wash and washer extractors. At the same time, clean press water is recovered and recycled for rinsing. Previously, that water would have simply been wasted down the drain.”


In addition, heat exchanger technology complements lower temperature washing and Christeyns’ Cool Chemistry chemicals have been developed to facilitate this. The use of neutral pH chemicals, low temperature washing and safe, effective bleach, minimise damage to textiles resulting in longer textile life. Heat loss from the dryers can also be recaptured and recycled. All these steps together lead to big savings.


Camplings Linen is a great example of what can be achieved. In February 2017, Camplings launched its new 30,000sq ft laundry plant on Harfrey’s Industrial Estate in Great Yarmouth. The new facility, now one of the country’s most sophisticated commercial laundries, provided an


increased capacity of 25% allowing the business to process up to 500,000 pieces of linen a week.


Christeyns won the contract based on its ‘Cool Chemistry’ system, and also supplied £750,000 worth of detergent dosing and monitoring equipment, along with water and energy equipment that allows the laundry to operate steam free, recycling both water and energy.


The new site uses circa 3.2 litres of water per kilo of textile washed in the tunnel washers, compared to their old system which used around six litres per kilo. This meant an overall reduction in water consumption of well over 40% as well as total energy consumption by 30%.


Aveyard explains that historically, steam boilers were used in laundries that heated water to extremely high temperatures. Modern new build laundries are moving away from steam as these high temperatures are no longer needed. Less water being used plus the recovered heat make the industry less reliant on the generation of steam. Having a ‘zero steam’ operation also reduces water consumption by 0.25 – 0.5 L/KG of textile processed.


Aveyard continued: “Through continued research, Christeyns can provide innovative solutions that will encourage customers to make the necessary changes, solutions that will affect their bottom line and enable them to continue to run a sustainable business. These changes – a combination of machinery, technology and science – will have long term benefits for the environment as well as improving a customer’s profitability and output.”


www.christeyns.com www.camplings-linen.co.uk


www.tomorrowscleaning.com


COMMERCIAL LAUNDRY | 49


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