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Double win for CLARITY at The Planet Mark Awards


CLARITY-The Soap Cọ. won Best Newcomer and Best Employee Engagement categories at the prestigious The Planet Mark Awards held at Sadler’s Wells Theatre on 12 October.


At the ceremony, CLARITY was acknowledged as a social enterprise that is setting best practice in its sector and beyond for reducing its carbon footprint via a series of green initiatives.


Steve Malkin, founder of The Planet Mark, said: “The culture at CLARITY-The Soap Cọ. is embodied in every product, process and individual. The charity’s approach to environmental and social sustainability is exemplary, and it is just the start.”


CLARITY has reduced its carbon footprint by 15% per unit produced in the period 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018, with its offices full of posters relating to engaging staff in the


Monthind hits the target with RFCA contract


Monthind Clean has announced that it has secured a three- year contract through tender to work with the East Anglia Reserve Forces & Cadets Association (RFCA).


The contract will see Monthind deliver specialist cleaning services at firing ranges across the region. Local teams from Norfolk, Essex, Suffolk, Cambridgeshire and Hertfordshire will visit sites with specialist equipment to deep-clean kitchens and remove contaminates bi-annually from 40 RFCA sites across the region.


Ceri Clark, Contract Support Manager at Monthind Clean, explained: “It’s another example of how unusual our work can be. We’ve had to buy in specialist explosion-proof vacuum cleaners, and our teams go in in full personal


14 | WHAT’S NEW?


conservation of energy and recycling of materials.


Under the auspices of its Green Team, the company is now working to entrench sustainability and eco issues in the organisation's DNA, with every opportunity taken to promote initiatives both internally and externally using a wide range of media channels.


The social enterprise’s manufacturing plant now runs on green energy sources derived from bio-mass fuels, has turned its main boiler down by 10°C and uses only Forestry Stewardship Council paper in its offices in a drive to reduce its carbon emissions and increase its sustainable practices.


Camilla Marcus-Dew, Head of Commercial at CLARITY-The Soap Cọ., said: “We are committed to reducing our carbon footprint annually. Naturally, we are very proud to have won these awards, but we are not an organisation to rest on our laurels and will continue to find ways to improve our sustainability credentials.”


www.thesoapco.org


protective equipment. Our job is to seal individual areas and stage clean to remove firing contaminates from the ceilings to the floors and everything in between.


“When you tell people you work in the cleaning industry, they imagine it’s all about mops and buckets. As a specialist cleaning company, we are able to plan and deliver some really fascinating and unusual contracts, and the RFCA is a great example of the diversity of the work we do.”


The East Anglia RFCA is responsible for maintaining safe and compliant buildings for the Reserves Forces and Cadet Forces. This includes the upkeep and day-to-day running of 200 sites across the region.


Nationally, RFCAs are responsible for the upkeep and development of 350 Army Reserve Forces sites and 2,300 cadet sites on behalf of the Ministry of Defence.


www.monthindclean.co.uk twitter.com/TomoCleaning


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