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Doors, Windows & Glazing Feature


Maintenance & Refurbishment


Permanance and sustainability


Among the many benefits aluminium has to offer, Andrew Cross of Kestrel Aluminium discusses its ability to forecast the cost of maintenance over a system’s design life.


W


ith increasing pressure to specify building systems offering clearly defined sustainability, the use of materials that embody recycling as an inherent feature is becoming increasingly significant.


Aluminium as a key building component is now used across a wide


range of sectors and, as a matter of interest, is still arguably the most valuable item in our recycling collection. From an emissions perspective, the use of pre- and post-use aluminium greatly reduces energy consumption and adds tangible value to the economics of production. To put this into perspective, it saves around 95 per cent of the energy consumed in the 'primary' production process.


For those specifying metal window and door systems, there is, therefore,


a clear incentive to use a raw material that can be reused on an infinite basis. In terms of enabling building designs to achieve the highest level of BREEAM certification, aluminium can also provide tangible benefits in terms of assessment of an asset’s environmental, social and economic sustainability through the use of standards developed by BRE. In addition, it enhances specific aspects of technical performance such as thermal, acoustic and energy efficiency. The use of natural materials - timber in particular - undoubtedly has its supporters, but most offer little potential for recycling. Deforestation, dwindling


www.housingmmonline.co.uk | HMM June/July 2021 | 31


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