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Efficiency


Heating & Renewable Energy Feature


Social housing providers in radon risk areas can gain peace of mind that they are meeting their duty of care to residents by working with experienced companies that can offer a complete solution to radon reduction


contaminated air out of a home by introducing fresh air into the property. Located in the loft, PIV systems draw fresh air into the loft cavity where it is filtered via high grade ISO 45 per cent Coarse (G4 grade) or ISO ePM2.5 70 per cent (F7 grade) filters and warmed before being slowly added into the habitable areas of the house. In properties with very high levels of radon an active radon sump may be


necessary, fitted with a fan. Sumps work effectively under solid floors, and under suspended floors if the ground is covered with concrete or a membrane, drawing the gas out of the building and venting it to the atmosphere through pipes. Once installed, it’s important the equipment is serviced to ensure they remain


in good working order to maintain maximum efficiency and keep radon at safe levels. This will also help stop the build-up of grease and dirt damaging the systems and avoid future breakdowns. Social housing providers in radon risk areas can gain peace of mind that they


are meeting their duty of care to residents by working with experienced companies that can offer a complete solution to radon reduction. From testing, through to installing solutions and on-going maintenance, radon can be effectively tackled to keep residents safe.


James Kane is sales director at Airtech Solutions


28 | HMM June/July 2021 | www.housingmmonline.co.uk


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