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34 Dartmouth Castle Running Head


DARTMOUTH CASTLE


One of the most beautifully located fortresses in England. For over 600 years Dartmouth Castle has guarded the narrow entrance to the Dart Estuary and the busy, vibrant port of Dartmouth. It enjoys stunning views of the estuary and out to sea and offers a great family day out, whatever the weather. Kid friendly, it’s long been a must-do outing when visiting Dartmouth.


This fascinating complex of defences was begun in 1388 by John Hawley, privateering Mayor of Dartmouth and the prototype of the flamboyant ‘Shipman’ in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. About a century later the townsmen added the imposing


and well-preserved ‘gun tower’, probably the very first fortification in Britain purpose-built to mount ‘ship-sinking’ heavy cannon. Climb to the top for breath-taking views across the estuary and see how it could be blocked in wartime by a heavy chain laid across the river to Kingswear Castle on the opposite bank.


Unusually incorporating the fine church of St Petrox, the castle saw action during the Civil War, and continued in service right up until the Second World War. Successive updating included the Victorian ‘Old Battery’ with its remounted heavy guns, guardrooms and maze of passages to explore.


Opening Times 17 May-1 Nov, daily 10am-5pm 2 Nov-31 Mar, Sat-Sun 10am-4pm 24-26 Dec & 1 Jan Closed Last entry 30 mins before closing.


Entrance prices


Non-Members, with Gift Aid: Adult £8.70 | Concession £7.90 | Child £5.20 Family 2 Adults £22.60 | Family 1 Adult £13.90


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