search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
FEATURE


the string shut. Fern was trapped. I had my hands over my eyes, the tension of those last few seconds while he crept within range too unbearable to watch. Fern was an old bird and she died the following year. She and Alex never had viable chicks.


Learning from past mistakes The four entrances and exits have all got double doors and spring closers. But the last aviary escape was not through a door carelessly left open, this has happened, nor from storm damage. I lost seven lovebirds forever when the commercial steel aviary blew over in a gale. No, our most recent escape which had a fortunate ending was due to the Casper, my pet Grey’s curiosity. When we first erected the aviary, we


didn’t use strong enough wire for the walls. But as everything inside the structure, all the aviary furniture points inwardly my birds never perch on the exterior wire. They chew the branches, play with the toys and leave the exterior walls alone. Only Casper spotted a plastic cable outside the aviary. He chewed a hole through the reed screening, and then chewed a hole to reach the plastic coated cable. Luckily. no electric current was on. Normally, I’d have noticed something amiss when I bring the pet birds inside every night. But it was December, bitterly cold and I hurried my visits without proper inspection.


By day two, Tinga was still out and Tingo appeared fluffed up and cold on top of the aviary roof in an unsheltered cage. I had a brainwave. Birds don’t like to fly into the dark. So I put Tingo’s cage into the end flight but lit it up with a spotlight.


However, two kakariki and Tinga the


female sun conure were more observant than I. They were gone in the morning at 9am when I went to feed the flock. The kakariki were easy to trap. I stood a


play stand its bowls stuffed with sunflowers, peanuts and chopped apples in the porch door and kept a watch from the kitchen. The kakariki started feeding from the bowls by noon and were caught by my slamming the porch door before they had a chance to fly off. Tinga the sun conure had no intention of


copying them. She was feeding herself in the oak trees above the aviary. I put Tingo her mate in cage and another cage on top and began the watch. Tinga would fly down to chat with Tingo. She even flew into the second cage but we were unable to shut her in the cage before she’d fly off. Bear in mind it was very cold and we are rather old. By day two, Tinga was still out and Tingo appeared fluffed up and cold on top of the aviary roof in an unsheltered cage. I had a brainwave. Birds don’t like to fly into the dark. So I put Tingo’s cage into the end flight but lit it up with a spotlight.


BIRD SCENE 41


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50