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behaviour problems like biting and screaming, to manage birds on exhibit, to teach birds to cooperate in their own medical care and to allow us to facilitate captive breeding practices.


Positive Reinforcement Training is Science Based Understanding the science behind training has become more widespread in the last few years. But the old fashioned ideas like


Positive and negative reinforcement terms


Positive Reinforcement: The presentation of a stimulus following a behaviour that serves to maintain or increase the frequency of the behaviour. Another name for positive reinforcement is reward training. Positive reinforcements tend to be valued or pleasant stimuli. To gain positive reinforcers, learners often without being asked, exceed the minimum effort necessary to gain them. Recommended! Negative Reinforcement: The removal of a stimulus following behaviour that serves to maintain or


increase the frequency of the behaviour. Another name for negative reinforcement is escape/avoidance training. Negative reinforcers tend to be aversive or unpleasant stimuli. To avoid negative reinforcers, learners often only work to the level necessary to avoid them. (An example in my bird life is showing Perdy Cockatoo a net when I want her to enter a flight in order to step up to come indoors. She complies quickly but I am no nearer getting a reliable step up from her,) Punishment: The presentation of an aversive stimulus, or removal of a positive reinforcer, that serves to decrease or suppress the frequency of the behaviour. The use of punishment tends to produce detrimental side effects such as counter aggression, escape behaviour, apathy and fear. Also, punishment doesn’t teach the learner what to do to earn positive reinforcement. (Squirting with a spray of water to stop screaming.) Not Recommended!


“show him who’s boss” or “don’t let a bird perch above you” are still heard. Wild birds do not bite. That is behaviour that we teach them


by using the wrong methods to control them. This


is the real underlying message of Heidenreich’s teaching. She has written:


00 BIRD SCENE


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