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BY


DOROTHY SCHWARZ


RETRIEVING LO AVIARY BIRDS


I


n an ideal world birds wouldn’t fly off. Although fly offs are usually due to human error, bad luck or accidental


mistakes can occur. Through a mix of ill luck and bad judgement, I’ve experienced more of them than I should have. Here are some strategies that I’ve used over the last sixteen years to retrieve birds lost from an aviary, who are rarely hand tame. Our homemade aviary in six


34 BIRD SCENE


interconnecting sections survives wind and storm conditions because the wind has somewhere to escape. But mistakes in construction led to our first loss. The roof wire is stapled to a live oak. A section had worked free and a pair of wily Rosellas and a canny cockatoo had spotted the gap. All three went missing the same morning. An hour later, Perdy the Lesser Sulphur Cockatoo who is tame, flew down to a


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