search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
The science also teaches us that even innate behaviours are modifiable. And most importantly we learn to create and modify behaviour with kinder and gentler methods. This allows reduction in stress, trust building bonds with caretakers, the avoidance of learned aggressive behaviours and the many other drawbacks often associated when aversive strategies are used to influence behaviour.


away if it can. Labels aren’t helpful. A bird wanting to perch higher does not necessarily need to dominate you but may just want to feel safe himself. Barbara also says, by understanding the science we are able to remove misconceptions and erroneous interpretations of behaviour. The science also teaches us that even innate behaviours are modifiable. And most importantly we learn to create and modify behaviour with kinder and gentler methods. This allows reduction in stress, trust building bonds with caretakers, the avoidance of learned aggressive behaviours and the many other drawbacks often associated when aversive strategies are used to influence behaviour. Of course in real life, outside of controlled laboratory conditions, there are occasions when we simply have to crate the bird or put it back in its cage. If your bird has a basic trust in you and your handling, that


12 BIRD SCENE


trust is not destroyed by occasionally forcing the bird against its will. Although Barbara would prefer caregivers take the time to train the behaviour so that force is never required. When trained to fluency the bird will load into a crate quickly even in an emergency, says Barbara.


What the birds learned in the workshop Participants at the workshop saw some of these principles working out in practice. I learned a lot watching Barbara work


with the Hahn’s macaw. After a little work on training step up from inside the cage, she decided that the bird was too afraid of hands to take out and train outside of the cage. Instead she demonstrated when birds are wary or frightened of hands, progress can still be made by training through the cage bars. The bird eventually learned to touch a target stick to receive a food reward. This simple but important behaviour is a good first step towards building trust and working towards a step up behaviour. With the pair of Caiques who were more


confident, Barbara worked with each one individually while the partner either stayed on the perch or if too intrusive was stepped back into the cage . After watching the birds’ owner struggle, Barbara also demonstrated how to train each bird to willingly go back into their cage. Both the Caiques kept up a running commentary of calls and whistles throughout most of the day.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50