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OFFSHORE WIND FARMS & RENEWABLES


Pegasus Welfare Solutions Ltd (PWS) Wins Contract for Its Unique Offshore Hygiene Systems to Support Moray East’s ‘Covid- Secure’ Workplace


UK-based Pegasus Welfare Solutions Ltd (PWS) has won a contract to supply its ground- breaking offshore hygiene and welfare units for all three offshore substations on the Moray East Offshore Wind Farm.


Its patented multi-unit portable toilets and lightweight welfare ‘habitats’, along with cleaning and sanitising equipment, will support Moray Offshore Windfarm (East) Limited (MOWEL) to provide workers with a ‘Covid-secure’ workplace.


The contract – to run throughout the wind farm’s construction phase, with future options – includes providing and ongoing management of all welfare provision for the substations on the 100-turbine wind farm in the Moray Firth, Scotland.


The contract win – PWS’ first in Scotland – will also lead to expansion for the east of England-based business. It plans to set up a fabrication centre in Scotland for its modular units built on marine grade aluminium frames, and is preparing to move into a new head office and manufacturing base in Norfolk soon.


The Moray East contract is its third offshore wind contract win in six weeks.


PWS Managing Director Dan Greeves designed and patented the unique welfare solutions after identifying an opportunity to provide the same workforce hygiene facilities as on shore.


Although offshore wind farm construction projects complied with all Construction, Design and


August 2020 www.sosmagazine.biz 41


Manufacturing (CDM) 2015 regulations onshore, they were unable to offer the same level of welfare offshore because no hygiene and welfare system that met the relevant criteria was available.


As well as meeting health regulations, PWS solutions also improve safety and productivity offshore by cutting down ladder climbs to and from CTVs for toilets and handwashing by at least a third.


Mr Greeves said: “This contract builds on the importance of providing a simple but effective hygiene and welfare environment that has become a mainstay of keeping people safe offshore. Our innovative patented design is a cost-effective solution that adds value to clients.


PWS’ lightweight marine-grade aluminium-framed welfare solutions – a modular system that can be toilets, showers, eye wash stations and hand wash stations – are lifted carrying workforce equipment increasing safety standards as well as hygiene.


“The award by MOWEL recognises the benefit Pegasus products and systems bring to the offshore wind sector. As the ‘new normal’ becomes commonplace offshore, PWS has invested in creating a suite of solutions that are imperative in a COVID-19 world and are proven to increase safety and productivity whilst enabling diversity by offering female workers hygiene facilities and reducing cost.”


Marcel Sunier, MOWEL Project Director, said: “This contract led by Moray East is the latest in a series of wins for UK business in the renewable sector, will facilitate an expansion by PWS who plan to further invest in local premises and staff to meet operational needs.


“A win-win, as we ensure the provision of a safe workplace whilst continuing to construct this critical asset, to strengthen the provision of clean energy from offshore wind.”


Installing PWS welfare solutions offshore has cut ladder climbs by a third.


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