search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
72 INSULATION


As reverberation is caused by sounds bouncing off hard surfaces, minimising the number of those hard surfaces will be a solid first step. If this isn’t possible – and, for hygiene reasons, cafes need wipe-clean surfaces – it’s possible to counter the impact of all these reverberant surfaces by adding absorbent materials. The most commonly employed anti-reverberation product is the sound absorption panel. These are fabric covered and are mounted on the walls or suspended from the ceiling. When the sound wave enters the open cell structure or fibrous composition of the panel, it bounces around like a pinball. The friction resulting from each instance of impact is converted into low-level heat, which is absorbed into the material. When the sound wave re-emerges, its energy – and consequently its ‘loudness’ – is significantly diminished. A useful measure for the effectiveness of any sound absorption solution is BB93: acoustic design of schools – performance standards, which gives the minimum performance standards required for acoustics in school buildings. Although this document only refers to schools, architects often use it as a benchmark when treating reverberation issues generally.


Childcare institutions with sound design


The design of spaces for children is intriguing because of the permanent influence it can have on them. A new online theme by Danish acoustic panel manufacturer Troldtekt explores through articles and expert interviews how good acoustics plays its part when designing these areas. Of course, other factors such as colour, shapes, robustness and finish also have an impact but so does sound. Careful design considerations are particularly important because a child’s environment moulds their perspectives for the future. Studies such as Bronzaft and McCarthy (1975) have shown the effect noise has on wellbeing and learning – This is the reason why the products of specialist manufacturers like Troldtekt are specified to solve the problems of noise and reverberated sounds. If acoustic absorption is ineffective, discomfort and irritation will result from the reverberations. If it is designed well, the participant’s interest will increase, as many case studies for new and transformed buildings prove. The benefits of 100 per cent Troldtekt natural wood wool panels include high sound absorption, high durability, natural breathability, low cost life cycle performance and sustainability.


www.troldtekt.co.uk Townhouse insulated with Spacetherm®


The heat efficiency of a Grade II listed Georgian townhouse in the historic city of Bath is set to be dramatically improved as a result of the introduction of Spacetherm®


The challenge of dealing with heating


inefficiencies, major heat loss and high heating costs are a common problem with many listed buildings and solid wall dwellings. Spacetherm Multi, from A. Proctor Group, is a high-performance laminate specifically designed to be laid directly onto existing floors & walls. The use of Spacetherm Multi has virtually no negative impact on floor space, making it ideal for refurbishment projects where space is at a premium.


01250 872261 www.proctorgroup.com Multi insulation. Classic style meets modern innovation


A new build home has embraced a ‘best of both worlds’ philosophy by combining traditional aesthetics with the exceptional fabric performance provided by the Kingspan TEK Building System. Constructed with innovative Structural Insulated Panels from the Kingspan TEK Building System,


the house enjoys excellent thermal performance, making it both comfortable and efficient. Kingspan TEK Building System panels comprise a highly insulated core sandwiched between two layers of Oriented Strand Board type 3 (OSB/3) and can deliver U-values as low as 0.17 W/m2


K without the need for additional insulated liners. 01544 387 384 www.kingspantek.co.uk


BB93 requires that the Reverberation Time in a classroom be as little as 0.4 seconds in some cases. So, the sound pressure of the reflected noise has to decrease by 60 decibels in less than half a second. Although this might not be necessary in a cafe environment, it’s a worthy target.


Challenges


Some environments are more challenging than others. Recently, CMS Danskin Acoustics had to reduce reverberation issues in the cafe at the Royal Observatory in Edinburgh, a building that is well over 100 years old, with all that entails in terms of adapting to modern Building Regulations. In such cases, design flexibility is key, fabricating to fit the unusual shapes and angles typical to listed buildings, and even creating sound absorption panels that accommodated antique light fittings. By taking reverberation out of the ‘noise


mix’ – visitors to the cafe can speak clearly over the other acoustic intrusions, without having to raise their voices and set in motion the dreaded Lombard Effect.


Paul Absolon is technical director at CMS Danskin Acoustics


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF NOVEMBER 2019


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100