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48 PROJECT REPORT: HOTELS, RESTAURANTS & BARS


and a small level of protection against the elements.


Once in the coffee house, visitors can view what Jonathan Mizzi calls the “dimpled underbelly of the brass smile.” He adds: “When you walk in you’re engulfed,” tells Jonathan, “like Jonah being swallowed by the whale.”


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The roof is constructed in rigid GRP foam providing strong insulating properties, with its interior shaped to reference coffers found in classical architecture


This view provides an “uplifting sense of reveal,” he says with the texture again proving reminiscent of nature – though this time in more of a tortoiseshell effect. Architectural precedents are not forgotten in the design however – it does not set out to be wholly individualistic. The interior offers a likeness to coffers you’d find in underground tunnels, or on the interior of the Pantheon’s dome.


The brief


Looking back now to the site pre-development, when the secluded spot among the trees hosted a less glamorous and visible kiosk at the rear end of the site, it was decided by the Royal Parks authority that a new addition was needed to revamp the site as part of a wider scheme across its parks.


The tender – for which Colicci appointed WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


the catering contract – was to create a ‘fleet’ of kiosks and coffee houses for most of the Royal Parks – Green, St James’ and of course the Serpentine’s home, Hyde Park. After a design competition was held, Mizzi Studio submitted successful plans, and were invited to join as design partner two years ago, having already developed a seven year, long-standing relationship with the client Colicci.


Part of brief for the group of buildings was that they would be “ambassadors, functional sculptures and way-finders within the parks,” and obviously to serve as a refreshment zone along the way. Jonathan continues: “The brief was that every kiosk would respond to each site individually, and be unique – but, much like siblings, they had to share common genetic features which would holistically tie into a language and identity that you recognise.”


When Jonathan and the team at Mizzi first approached the Hyde Park site with this in mind, the key question he asked himself was: “Well, how can we optimise this site layout?” The existing kiosk of course needed replacing, situated far back from the road


ADF NOVEMBER 2019


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