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Security & Fire Protection Out Crime for 30 years


Architects & Town Planners Architects and Town Planners can request a professional development session on crime prevention and designing out crime from SBD.


The presentation content includes relevant legislation, policy and guidance; an overview of property crime trends; an evaluation of why crime occurs and an introduction to SBD. We explain how buildings can be made physically secure by having doors, windows and locks that meet attack resistant standards, and how an open, welcoming and safe environment can be achieved by incorporating crime prevention design into the layout and landscaping of the immediate surroundings in subtle ways that will be barely noticeable to residents.


Academic research has consistently shown significant reductions in crime when our principles are built-in compared to non-SBD developments.


To request a Continuing Professional Development presentation contact: info@crimepreventionacademy.com


Police Preferred Specification The importance for buildings of all types to be physically secure to deter criminal activity, reduce crime and keep people safe is why SBD has worked with businesses, the construction industry and standards authorities at home and abroad for many years. This led us to develop a product based police accreditation scheme some 20 years ago - the Police Preferred Specification.


Our Police Preferred Specification ensures that products not only have been tested to relevant security standards but also are fully certified by an independent, third-party certification body accredited by the United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS). The Police Preferred Specification requires regular re-tests and inspections of the manufacturer’s production facility to ensure the correct processes, and product quality performance, remain at the highest levels.


Working in partnership with the industry to encourage advancements in manufacturing processes and materials, as well as product design and new technology, has ensured we have kept pace with changing patterns of criminal behaviour. Since SBD launched 30 years ago, there has been an overall reduction in property crime of 60% (Office of National Statistics, Nov 2014).


Why join SBD? •


• • • • •


SBD represents a powerful, trusted police brand which inspires greater public confidence in your products.


SBD has an established Police Preferred Specification accreditation scheme which is awarded only to products that meet our security requirements.


SBD is the only way for companies to obtain police accreditation for security-related products in the UK


The police service signpost customers looking for security products to the SBD website where a comprehensive list of companies that produce products that meet SBD Police Preferred Specification can be found.


SBD has more than 800 member companies, with thousands of products in more than 30 different categories that have already achieved Police Preferred Specification.


Member feedback has consistently indicated that SBD membership leads to more business opportunities and a 99% member retention rate proves this.


Find out more about the SBD initiative by visiting our website: www.securedbydesign.com for specific membership enquiries go to the ‘Member Companies’ page.


SECURED BY DESIGN


TEL: 0203 8623 999 33


WWW.SECUREDBYDESIGN.COM


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