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HALESWORTH OPEN ITS HERITAGE DOORS


Ivan Holmes Community Award Presentation - 2019


FOR one weekend, 21st and 22nd September, Halesworth will be opening its heritage doors to residents and visitors alike with an invitation to explore some of its lesser known corners. This will be the third time Halesworth has taken part in the national Heritage Open Days Scheme co-ordinated by the National Trust. With the theme ‘Halesworth on the Map’ the organisers this year aim to make sure the town lives up to its reputation as a place worth exploring. Eight Halesworth historic


houses and sites will be open for pre-booked tours, giving a rare chance to see inside some of the town’s most significant buildings. Three houses – Gothic House, the Old Rectory and the Black Eagle have features dating back well over 500 years, while Bank House (opened for the first time), Hooker House and Chapel House are Georgian at heart and Magnolia House and Wellington Court (the site of a notorious murder) date from Victoria’s reign. Between them, their former residents include two Directors of Kew Gardens (William and Joseph Hooker), a famous woman prison reformer (Priscilla Buxton), an archbishop, an actress and an M.P. A particular feature of this weekend will be a series of walks, each led by a local expert. There will be a chance to explore the Millennium Green and its surprising industrial past, including its links to Halesworth’s own canal, the Blyth Navigation, and the much-loved Southwold Railway. Still exploring the world of work, there will be tours of the last remains of what was once the town’s major industry, brewing and malting. The malting theme continues on Sunday with a tour of the Cut Arts Centre, itself once a state-of-the art Victorian maltings, spotting its original features and viewing the ‘Malt Experience’. Halesworth’s Heritage Trees will be the subject of a fascinating new trail highlighting ‘the oldest and most spectacular trees of our town’, while ‘Hidden Halesworth’ will look at Halesworth’s ‘little known stories and curious facts’. A highpoint of the weekend


will be the premiere in St. Mary’s Church on Saturday


(between the River Waveney and Bungay Golf Course)


OUTNEY MEADOW CARAVAN PARK


CAMPING AND CARAVANNING BESIDE THE RIVER WAVENEY


ROWING BOATS AND CANOES FOR HIRE


Spend a pleasant day out boating on the upper reaches of the River


Boats can be hired by the hour or by the day


Stockists of Calor and Camping Gas BIKES FOR HIRE


Tel: Bungay (01986) 892338 www.outneymeadow.co.uk


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*7 day cooling off BEC 7/BUN 7 AUGUST 2019


morning of ‘A Moment in Time: Halesworth AD 1415’, a play centring on the lives of the Argentein family, Halesworth’s mediaeval lords of the manor. With dance, music and chanting, the church, now able to show off its new, open and more flexible space, will be filled with the spirit of the middle ages. For music lovers, the recently formed Cut Choir will be giving a concert of songs on the Sunday afternoon, including one specially composed for the occasion on a Suffolk theme. It’s going to be a hands-on weekend too – for parents and children alike. At the church, there will be two Medieval Experience afternoon sessions where you can try your hand at bell-ringing, dress up and join a costumed tour or have a go at making lavender bags or a coat of arms. At Halesworth and District Museum, the kids can try brass-rubbing or handling fossils while the adults take a tour of the historic features of Halesworth Railway Station or view the special display about the Blyth Navigation. At the Cut there will be ‘craftivism’ sessions where you can create ‘something small and beautiful’ while at the Library, staff from the Lowestoft Record Office will be bringing along a selection of historical maps to mark this year’s special theme. You’ll be able to trace how the town developed and perhaps look to see what was on the site of your house a century or more ago. Staff will also be there to help you get started on your family history or to help you overcome those irritating blockages where you ‘can’t get back any further’. At Steeple End Gallery, housed in the town’s ancient almshouses, in addition to the usual fine displays of modern painting and sculpture, there will a special display on the history of the building. All the events and tours are


free of charge, but some have limited numbers and require booking at The Cut. To view timings and find out about booking arrangements, pick up a programme from local Tourist Information Points or visit the website, www. halesworthopendays.co.uk.


THE fourth annual Ivan Holmes Community Award was presented to Joyce Wilson by Mandy Holmes at the May Centre Anniversary Lunch in Beccles. Joyce Wilson has worked tirelessly for the May Centre in Beccles and has been the Manager for the past seven years. Joyce has expanded her volunteer role to much more than just managing the day to day running of the Centre, she has become a valued member of the team. In recognition of this sterling


work undertaken over these many years, she received the 2019 Ivan Holmes Community Award and Certificate. In addition to this Beccles Lions also presented her with a cheque for £250 to be donated to her nominated charity – which of course was the May Centre. Lion President Chris Lambert said, “This annual award is in memory of our late colleague Lion Ivan Holmes MJF, who was a member of the Beccles and District Lions Club for over 35 years. Throughout that time Ivan was an ever present figure within the Beccles Community, and, through this


award Beccles Lions wanted to recognise those people who, like Joyce tirelessly serve their community by helping to improve the lives of others. Before presenting the


award to Joyce, Mandy said, “The intention of this award is to act as an inspirational and motivational legacy, to continue Ivan’s good work and Joyce has clearly demonstrated this with all the caring and kindness she shows to others within our community. I know the club receives lots of nominations each year, and I would therefore like to acknowledge this by thanking every other nominee for the work they do within the local area, which of course is all voluntary. So to all the volunteers, whether clubs, societies or individuals that help to improve our community - thank you.” In response Joyce said, “I


would like to thank Mandy and Beccles and District Lions Club for this lovely award. It is completely unexpected and I feel very honoured and moved to be receiving it. To even be considered for the award was a surprise, and in addition to be recognised by others for doing things that one enjoys is


a great privilege and honour, which I really do appreciate it. There are so many dedicated volunteers in the community and without those who are committed to the May Centre I would not be able to manage the centre and provide our members with such a valuable resource. I will always treasure this award. Thank you.” The Ivan Holmes Community Award is an annual award presented by the Lions Club of Beccles and we are always pleased to receive nominations. If you know of any individual, club, society, or group of people who you believe deserves recognition of this kind please don’t hesitate to let us know. If you wish to know more


about the Beccles Lions Club and the work we do, please contact the club secretary Lion Gill Whitehead on 07738 493948 or visit our club’s website at www.beccleslions. club or follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Equally if you are interested in becoming a member of Beccles Lions Club then please telephone our Membership Chair Lion Malcolm Bardsley on 07710 249017.


From the Alfred Corry Lifeboat Museum


I am pleased to tell you that building work on the extension will commence in October/November so that the heavy work can take place before the winter really sets in. With the end of school term


we have been busy receiving school parties and role-play acting but our concrete floor is very hard and we are most grateful to Southwold Carpets for their kind gift of two large pieces of thick felt underlay, also to St Felix School for their kind donation of three large blue PE crash mats, which is just what we needed to create a safe blue sea under the model boat which plays an important part in the role- play sessions. We plan to hold our


annual Bric-a-Brac Sale at the Museum over the Bank Holiday weekend August 24th, 25th and 26th. A wide selection of new and pre- loved items, unwanted gifts, DVDs, books and much more will be on display, and on Sunday 25th and Monday 26th there will be a tombola. Please note these dates


in your diary and do please come along and enjoy yourself and help us with this big fund raising push for the extension. Finally, once again our Curator seeks the help of Old Southwoldians. He has an undated newspaper cutting


reporting on the ‘Harbour Mudlarks Annual Supper held at the Harbour Inn. The chairman was Mr P C Coveney, and entertainment including songs, violin, whistling and accordion was provided by some well known names associated with the Alfred Corry: F Goldsmith May, W May, F Upcraft, E Newson, R Palmer, E Palmer, D Palmer, B Palmer, G May and John Tooke with Percy Girling at the piano. The evening was arranged by John Tooke, but who were the ‘Harbour Mudlarks’? The fact that it was the ‘annual’ supper suggests that it was it an organised society and from the names it must have taken place at least 100 years ago. Do any of our readers remember, or know anything about, the Harbour Mudlarks? We should be very grateful for any assistance our readers can give us in resolving this conundrum. We look forward to seeing


you over the Bank Holiday weekend. Can I please appeal for


the gift of good quality paperback fiction. We have a good stock of hardback books but paperback novels for reading on the beach prove very popular and are in short supply. Thank you. Jack H Storer – Trustee


SERVICES


From Left to Right – Mandy Holmes, Beccles Lions Welfare Officer Dermot Wesley-Smith, Joyce Wilson 2019 Ivan Holmes Community Award recipient, Club President Lion Chris Lambert.


U3A Beccles July talk - Nurses, Laundresses, Midwives, Wise Women:


Medieval Women as Healers. Dr Joy Hawkins


DR Hawkins returned to the Beccles U3A to give another interesting talk, this time on the role of women in healthcare in the Middle Ages. She is a Lecturer in Humanities teaching at the UEA. Much attention has been paid


to the medieval physician and surgeon, but behind the scenes, there was a whole host of female healers, mopping up bodily fluids and providing herbal remedies for every ache, pain and illness. If you found shelter in a medieval hospital, it would be a nurse who was your sole carer. Whilst the female head of the household was expected to care for both her family and servants, treating everything from dog bites to dysentery on a daily basis.


They were excluded from academic institutions, female healers of the Middle Ages had little opportunity to contribute to the science of medicine. Rather, they served as herbalists, midwives, surgeons, barber- surgeons, nurses, and the traditional healers. Untutored in medicine, they used therapies based on botanicals, traditional home remedies, purges, bloodletting, and native intelligence. Wives were expected to take


care of the health of the whole family, including servants and to cultivate a garden containing herbs to aid healing. Upon marriage husbands often gave their wives an instruction manual which included every aspect of healthcare from


recipes to make for a good diet to how to deal with fleas in the bed. In summary women had a


vitally important role to play throughout the whole lifecycle from bringing new life into the world, looking after all aspects of healthcare for the whole extended family throughout their lives and finally washing and wrapping the bodies upon death. Next U3A meeting:


Wednesday 18th September: Dogs for the deaf. Ann Jillings and Varley the dog. Beccles Public Hall. Doors open 9.45am for refreshments for 10.30am start. Members free. Visitors £2.50.


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