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GOLF


The iconic Headland Hotel sits next to the course


Course History


Royal visits, the Headland Riots and a Harry Colt’s design. These events have shaped the course and club into what it is today; one of Cornwall’s finest. A revered Harry Colt designed course built in 1890. Not only a landmark of natural beauty, Newquay’s iconic Links also possesses a colourful and exciting history that has made it the prestigious club that it is today. The location of Newquay’s Golf Links is perhaps one of the finest in the world, along the whole length of the wonderful stretch of sand known as Fistral Beach.


The Headland Riots


One man had a vision to make Cornwall the rival of the south coast resorts. The plan be- gan at Newquay and the man was Silvanus Trevail.


In 1890, Trevail, once Mayor of Truro, formed the Cornish Hotels Company, with the aim to create a chain of first class hotels whose guests could move between them at a whim.


His vision was to turn them into an upmarket estate, the pinnacle being a luxury hotel called the Headland.


The scheme was not without enemies and the discontent of Newquay locals finally erupted into the now infamous Headland Riots.


The proposed site of the hotel had previously been used as land on which farmers grazed livestock and local fishermen dried their nets.


It is little wonder that their hackles rose as Trevail’s proposals threatened to ruin their livelihoods. Despite local opposition, work on the Headland Hotel began in August 1897.


Outraged farmers and fishermen rushed to the site, where they tore down the wooden works office. Valuable tools and planks of wood were hurled off the cliff. When Trevail returned to the site the following day, the mob were waiting. Missiles, including eggs and apples were hurled at him, before he was pinned to the railing and subjected, as the press reported, to a “very fierce outpouring of contempt and insolent abuse.”


Although hundreds took part in the demonstration, only twenty-two men were charged. The men were fined £2 each, a large sum in those days, for committing malicious damage to goods. Construction continued, although unemployed miners from Redruth had to be


employed as local workers were reluctant to return.


Today the Headland is as grand a hotel as Trevail could have wished, although it got off to a shaky start.


The Links


The original plans for the land were to build a housing estate where the golf club now lies, with three parallel roads running between Tower Road and the sea. The Headland Riots of 1887 prevented this, meaning the planned development came to a halt, and the Links were spared.


Since the election of the club’s first president, Mr H F Whitefield in 1890, the club has seen considerable developments. In 1908, it obtained a new lease from the Treffry Estate, expanding the club’s grounds further to the 6,000 yards that it is today and introducing the 11th and 12th fairways. Thanks to Colt’s revolutionary designs, the club has always prided itself on its modern course planning techniques. Over the years, no expense has been spared to make the course the best it can possibly be.


It’s trying to get that message across, that we are making what’s good even better


5th hole 34 PC August/September 2019





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