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GOLF


The year I came in they spent £25,000 on spare parts alone. The fleet was on its knees


the hills providing a beautiful backdrop. It has some nice elevation changes and is not too demanding when walking - the hillier parts are early in the round, then it flattens out. We have a small practice area - chipping green and putting green - and we have a bigger practice area which, unfortunately, is situated away from the clubhouse at the end of the driveway.”


“The course lies on a heavy clay soil profile. The topography works quite well


though being at the foot of the hills, so a lot of surface water does run through as it’s not the sort of heavy clay where the water sits on top, slowly absorbs and gets muddy. Additionally, over the last fifteen years, a lot of drainage work has been carried out on the more problematic areas. I was told by a lot of sales reps when I came here that I wouldn’t get much work done in the winter; its reputation being that it was really wet. But it hasn’t turned out like that, it’s been a good site to work with. Whenever we look to carry out drainage works, there is always a decent outlet to take it to.”


Steven explains that the greens consist of three different construction types. “The course, designed by Alister MacKenzie, was built in 1927 and all the original eighteen greens were clay based push-ups with no irrigation, so they held moisture. In 1940, the back nine of the course was compulsorily purchased by the government, and they built a military hospital on it because Malvern was away from any major cities and it was deemed a safe area to do that. The course


Course Manager, Steven Lloyd 18 PC August/September 2019





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