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Technical Paper


www.ireng.org


Speed Cells™


Speed Hex®


Flexibility of Speed Cell of Speed Hex on Existing buckled casing


Repair next to Hexmesh


8 Overview (Erosion-resistant) Refractory Materials for L/R-FCCU


8.1 Scope


This section outlines the requirements of shaped and monolithic (erosion resistant), insulating and dense refractory materials, which are used in


equipment and lines of (L/R)-fluid catalytic crackers. 8.2 Use of Tables


The use of the following tables are intended to help Contractor and/or HPI-engineers in the selection of refractory materials and their armour system, and to provide lining design criteria, such as type of materials, lining thickness, material performance.


characteristics and


The following tables summarise in general terms the thickness, the type of refractory material and the incorporated armour system in the individual equipment parts of an (L/R)-FCCU, of which not every listed equipment needs to be present. Even in case specific equipment is not mentioned in the table, reference should be made to similar but listed equipment, which operates under alike operational conditions.


Distinction is made between so-called ‘Hot Wall’


linings, i.e. generally stainless steel


equipment with external lagging, and ‘Cold Wall’ linings, i.e. carbon steel equipment with an internal (semi) erosion-resistant insulating refractory lining.


Classification of the monolithic and shaped refractory materials is based on EN-ISO 1927-1 and EN-ISO 10081-1.


Layout of a typical (L/R)-FCCU 20 ENGINEER THE REFRACTORIES May 2019 Issue


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32