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IN SEASON


BAKED PEACHES WITH VANILLA, BUTTER, THYME & BROWN SUGAR


This wonderful late-summer dessert is easy to assemble and incredibly delicious. It’s the perfect thing to cook as the flames die back and you are left with a nice bed of chunky embers. You can do the same thing with apples or plums; they will be equally good.


SERVES 4


4 ripe peaches 50g unsalted butter, softened 1 vanilla pod, split lengthways 2 tbsp soft brown sugar Grated zest of half a lemon 4 sprigs of thyme


1 Prepare your fire and let it die back a bit. You want a nice bed of moderately hot embers – a little flaming wood and smoke is fine.


2 Halve the peaches and remove the stone. Lay the peach halves, cut side up, on a double layer of foil, large enough to encase the peaches in a parcel.


3 Put the butter into a bowl. Scrape the vanilla seeds from the pod and add them to the butter, along with the sugar and lemon zest; mix well. Dot a little of this sweet vanilla butter on each peach half. Top with the sprigs of thyme and throw in the split vanilla pod for good measure. Fold the foil over the peaches to create a neat sealed parcel.


4 Set the parcel carefully down in the embers of the fire. The peaches need to be cooked in a gentle, glowing heat, so don’t let them come into contact with any super- hot embers. Bake for 20–25 mins, rotating the parcel occasionally to ensure the peaches cook evenly.


5 Remove the parcel, open it and check if the fruit is tender by prodding it with a knife. If it’s not quite ready, rewrap and return to the fire for a little longer. Once the peaches are tender, serve them hot, with all the buttery sweet juices from the parcel, and cream if you like.


Outdoor Cooking: River Cottage Handbook No.17 by Gill Meller, published by Bloomsbury Publishing


BARBECUE CHILLI CHOCOLATE BROWNIES


Brownies are such simple things to cook on a barbecue, and this recipe is really easy. The ancho chilli pepper works so well with the chocolate in these brownies. Ancho chillis (dried poblano peppers) are fruity, smoky, and not too hot. It is definitely worth adding the chunk of cherry wood to get a very light, sweet- cherry smoke.


RECOMMENDED HEAT:


Set up a barbecue for indirect cooking at 180–200C, adding a chunk of cherry wood to the coals for a gentle smoke.


MAKES 20


400g unbleached golden caster sugar


225g unsalted butter, melted 60g good-quality cocoa powder


1 ancho chilli pepper, soaked in warm water until soft, then drained and finely chopped


1 tsp vanilla extract


4 large eggs 225g plain flour ½ tsp baking powder Pinch of fine sea salt


1 Line a rectangular baking tin, measuring approximately 13 x 9 inches (33 x 23cm), with baking paper.


2 Mix all the ingredients together in a large bowl, adding them in the order they appear in the ingredients list and folding in each time you add a new ingredient.


3 Pour the brownie mixture into the lined baking tin. Pop in the barbecue for around 25 mins, until the mixture is just set. You don’t want the brownies to be too overcooked, as the centres should be a bit soft and fudgy.


4 Once cooled slightly, cut into squares while in the baking tin— cutting four lines by five gives 20 lovely chilli brownies.


Food & Fire by Marcus Bawdon, published by Dog 'n' Bone


FOODLOVERMAGAZINE.COM | 21


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