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INTERVIEW


excited about, it gets played on the radio. It’s definitely a vibrant scene and has been for a long time now. Before, what people refer to as the ‘melbourne scene’ started getting a lot of attention overseas it was still going strong. Do you have fun touring overseas? I love travelling, it’s a great way to see the world. Like I’m currently stood on the corner of 6th Avenue- Avenue of the Americas in Manhattan and it’s awesome just watching the world go by. We make it fun, if it wasn’t fun I can’t really imagine it. What’s your favourite continent that you’ve done shows in? I think I liked Europe. I liked the history of it, and the way bands are treated over there. It’s really encouraging, and it’s beautiful as well. As far as travelling goes, to witness another world and culture- you’re in a new country every day, it’s really exciting. I know Europe, in particular Mainland Europe has some really weird venues, do you have any that really stand-out for you? Yeah, there’s definitely some interesting ones. I remember, somewhere in Germany- maybe it was Munich? We played in an old sewer I think, like a drain that used to run to the river or something. It’s all blocked off now. It was like two stories underground. It was this circular room; the fire escape was behind the stage– you had to go through the stage to the fire escape. So, we had to also keep the stage free of any instruments. It was all really strange but was still a really fun night. What was the first song you learnt to play? Good question. I think it might’ve been, very early on, Blister in the Sun by Violent Femmes. What made you pick-up the guitar, then? I don’t know exactly. It was there, and then I just played it every day. There’s no reason, something must’ve attracted me, but I think it was just the idea of making tunes. I quickly


16 / JUNE-JULY 2019 / OUTLINEONLINE.CO.UK


started making up my own stuff, rather than learning other songs. I never had lessons or anything, I just taught myself. So, I just played around and sat on the couch for hours, watching cricket and playing guitar. You said you started writing from quite an early age, were there any early musical influences? Very early on, yeah I guess like the guitar style of Jeff Buckley was a big one, there was a record I used to listen to called Live at Sin-é. I think it was recorded at a little café in New York somewhere and he was just really expressive with what he played. That was certainly an influence. But I also listened to a lot of punk rock, a lot of pop-punk stuff that was a lot of power chords. I don’t think I wanted to play that though. Do you have any method when you’re writing? It’s different with every song. Like sometimes I get an idea from a rhythm or a drumbeat that I work around. Other times yeah I’ll learn how to play another song, and


it’ll introduce a chord to me that I haven’t played before, or that I’ve sort of forgotten about and I’ll just sort of start working around that. Basically, I don’t have a method it just kinda happens. What about when you’re writing with the band? Lately we’ve been sort of bringing ideas to the rehearsal without fleshing them out too much. So just jamming on songs for like half an hour and working out what is good and what isn’t good. Essentially expanding a song and then condensing it down. Is it a collective effort when writing? Yeah definitely, we all improvise from that very first moment. The parts are oſten exploded out of that and condensed into a 3-4minute pop song essentially. So yeah definitely collaborative. The cover art on your releases are all really nice. The French Press one it fantastic, there’s something slightly Edward Hopper about it, and the one for Hopes Down has a


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