search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
18 NO 1 NEW OXFORD STREET, LONDON


HEXAGONAL LEGACY


The project enabled the original architect Henry Philip Cart De Lafontaine’s rejected specification for green hexagonal tiles to be fulfilled


building had never been sufficient to support one.” Later, circumstances changed. The impending arrival of Crossrail triggered an increase of occupier demand and a hike in rental prices across central London – to the extent that a comprehensive refurbishment of Commonwealth House could be more seriously envisioned.


Plan & provision “We did the single floor study and then we were asked to do a feasibility exercise to examine the opportunities, should the entire building become vacant,” explains McRae. Over time, what was first intended to be a low-key interior renovation morphed into a brief to refurbish a large portion of the building.


The perimeter of the building remains unchanged from its original footprint resembling a right-angle triangle, which occupies the tight corner – much like New York City’s Flatiron Building. In elevation, No 1 extends to 10 stories with an additional roof garden fitted with lift access. From basement upwards, the programme houses a cycle facility with storage and changing rooms, the ground floor is composed predominantly of retail


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


spaces, in addition to the new full height office entrance and reception area on New Oxford Street. The first floor and upwards are devoted entirely to office space. Everything from ground-floor up to level six slab was retained from the original building: “What we did was remove level seven and level eight, then we rebuilt them to a larger footprint and added an extension to level nine,” says McRae, allowing for precious commercial floorspace to added to the scheme. Prior to the refurbishment, a light well cascading down onto an external courtyard housing lavatory facilities was situated at the heart of the building’s plan. Taking advantage of the existing form, with every further level heading upwards, Orms’ design gradually expands each floor further into the space on the eastern side, sculpting a full height, glazed “light-funnel” atrium into the scheme. A bank of four lifts and bridge decks were installed at the western side of the space, which extend the entire elevation of the scheme from ground floor to roof garden.


In terms of structure, core samples of the concrete were taken to validate the loadings of the original building. The test results showed that the quality of the concrete was


ADF MAY 2019


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36