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96 INTERIORS; LANDSCAPING & EXTERNAL WORKS


New staircase impact sound insulation system from Schöck


in Europe, insulating stairs and landings against impact sound (acoustic insulation) has also been a high priority. This is largely due to the differences in dwelling types. In the UK only 14 per cent of the population have traditionally lived in apartments, whereas the average across the Euro area is 48 per cent and sometimes higher. However things are changing in the UK. Apartment living is


I


n the UK, Schöck is best known for its market leading Isokorb structural thermal break range (thermal insulation); but


dramatically on the rise, resulting in a marked increase in residential density. And in the interests of noise health protection, existing mandatory soundproofing standards are coming under ever-increasing scrutiny. As a result, Schöck has developed an


integrated impact sound insulation solution for all structural subsections on both straight and winding staircases Known as Tronsole, it is a system that combines dependable sound insulation with straightforward installation. Providing optimum standard-compliant soundproofing in apartment blocks and multi-use buildings. With conventionsal solutions, such as an unsecured individual elastomer support under the stairs, any displacement can result in a broken concrete edge due to incorrect support. This means the risk of dirt and gravel


getting into gaps between staircase and floor slab, which can easily reduce acoustic insulation performance by around 10 dB. Schöck Tronsole, by contrast, is a


Resiblock celebrating 15th anniversary


Resiblock and Rialto Homes are celebrating the 15th anniversary of the successful sealing of the Hewetts Quay site in Barking. Barking and Dagenham Council had anticipated that any flooding from the local River Roding would lead to removal of jointing


sand and the potential for destabilisation of the bedding sand. With the use of Clay Blocks at Hewetts Quay this risk was further heightened. Resiblock liaised with both Rialto Homes and Barking and Dagenham Council and Resiblock ‘22’ was installed in the Spring of 2004. In the 15 years since, Resiblock ‘22’ has withstood all minor flooding that has occurred in the area, while also protecting against trafficking in the area.


mail@resiblock.com


system that envelopes the entire staircase, totally minimising the risk of acoustic bridges. It consists of seven main product types that can be mixed and matched to form a fully integrated impact soundproof system either on-site, or in the prefabricating plant. It is suitable for emergency exits and complies with the requirements for fire resistance class R90 (subject to appropriate on-site additional reinforcement of the landing).


01865 290 890 www.schoeck.co.uk Introducing GEOCELL® foam glass gravel


Is there an insulation material which is lightweight, load bearing, moisture resistant and insulating? Suitable for almost any type of terrain and easy to process? A building material that is economical and environmentally sound? Introducing GEOCELL® glass gravel – a high quality insulation material made


foam


of 100 per cent recycled glass, meeting all requirements of a lightweight aggregate. GEOCELL®


foam glass gravel takes over the draining function,


is load bearing and functions simultaneously as thermal insulation. A brilliant solution for a thermal bridge-free floor construction in one easy step. Visit the Mike Wye website for more information.


www.mikewye.co.uk


ADF IS INDEPENDENTLY VERIFIED BY ABC


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF MARCH 2019


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