search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
26 INSIGHTS SITE LINES Wellness at heart


Racheal Cadey of Edge Architecture + Design explains how The Crown Estate’s new head office in London became the first WELL Platinum certified workplace in Europe, by putting wellness principles at the heart of the design


here is a growing body of evidence that makes a business case for wellness in the workplace. Effort and money invested in environments that support employee happiness and wellbeing have a direct impact on the bottom line. Harvard researchers, for example, have found that for every dollar spent on employee wellness, medical costs fall by $3.27, and costs related to absenteeism drop by a further $2.73. The World Green Building Council has highlighted how productivity can improve by 8-11 per cent, as a result of improved air quality. A study by Harvard University’s Healthy Buildings Program found that lowering carbon dioxide levels, boosting ventilation and removing toxic chemicals could increase productivity by 8 per cent. In a space where volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were removed, people scored 60 per cent higher in cognitive tests than in a typical office setting, and if


T


ventilation was improved as well, the test scores improved by 100 per cent.


The importance of natural light has also been highlighted as an important factor in performance at work. A US poll by Future Workplace found that 47 per cent of employees say they feel tired from the absence of natural light or a window and 43 per cent report feeling gloomy because of the lack of light. Last year, The British Council for Offices (BCO) published the


report, ‘Wellness Matters: Health and Wellbeing in offices and what to do about it,” to help decision makers in the property sector maximise their investment in wellbeing, to advise on how to choose between competing third-party assessment and rating tools, and to provide a ‘roadmap’ for incorporating wellness throughout a building’s lifecycle. The BCO found that perceptions of the costs of project delivery and certification could still be a barrier to


ARRIVING AT A NEW STANDARD


Head office of The Crown Estate at 1 St James's Market, London - seventh floor arrival Image © Andrew Hendry


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF MARCH 2019


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100