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40 PROJECT REPORT: RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS


The reception areas for each tower are as dramatic as the exterior, with their bright floors, solid surface desks and letter boxes, contrasting dark walls, and bespoke, characterful, terracotta pendant lights


By reconfiguring the stair cores and lobbies, aLL added 353 metres of net floor area to the apartments, which in turn added to their potential market value for the client. This took the efficiency score of the buildings from 80 per cent to 82.5 per cent, which Atlee says the client was “really happy about.”


The key intervention was in the lobbies on each floor of the towers – where there was effectively a “double lobby” previously, explains Atlee, “we now have a single lobby with the lift in and the staircase off it.” She adds: “this improves the arrival at the apartments too.”


The architects also created a shaft in the lift cores to use as a natural smoke vent, which meant a generator was not needed for smoke extract. This bit of design innovation to the existing scheme meant that a space that wouldn’t have otherwise been used delivered a carbon saving passive solution, and contributed to space savings.


aLL also identified unused space underneath the ground floor ramp for use as bike stores. This meant the ground floor could be entirely given over to revenue-generating office space, and “would activate the ground floor,” says Atlee. The basement also contains a 42-space car park, gym, and plant rooms.


Space standards Following aLL Design’s interventions, the apartments are now “quite spacious,” and the PRS and shared ownership apartments


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benefit from underfloor heating and engineered timber floors. All apartments meet London Housing Design Guide space standards, as well as Lifetime Homes. Lucy comments that the balconies “weren’t quite wide enough” for the guidance in the previously consented scheme, so these were increased.


Atlee adds that achieving the extra space “was a satisfying exercise, to make it work as efficiently as possible” – the 2.5 per cent extra space from rationalising the lobbies was all added to the internal area of apartments, meaning the residents would have increased functional and aesthetic benefits across all tenures. Adding floor area to individual apartments was chosen for compliance purposes as well as resident amenity and therefore market value, as adding levels above would have reduced the floor to floor heights. They needed to be 2.6 metres to comply with GLA guidance, and in any case to achieve this the architects needed to make service voids “minimal – services are contained in a shallow ceiling void. The project was initially designed by EPR to be tenure blind, and, says Atlee, “that was the way we carried it through, as the way we felt it should be done.” She adds: “The affordable elements are executed to the same high quality as the private elements.”


BREEAM & BIM


The project had high standards in terms of sustainability, with the apartments having been designed to Code for Sustainable


ADF MARCH 2019


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