search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
NEWS SALFORD TOWER


The Anaconda Cut completes


© Margot Krasojević SOUTH KOREA The ‘Lighthouse Hotel’


Margot Krasojević Architecture has completed the design of an offshore “lighthouse hotel” in Cheju, South Korea, which can harness wave energy to generate electricity by using the building’s form. The hotel design proposal is made up of three building elements that contain the hotel’s living, lobby and social areas. Layered aluminium surface elevations are wrapped around the hotel’s elements and suspended from the pivoting primary structure, and enclose flip-wing turbines to produce electrical energy when they are lowered into the sea. Seawater crashes into the aluminium panels, flipping over the hydropower turbines.


“The flowing turbines flex as water flows over them, similar to an oscillating wave surge converter” said the architects. “The flip wings are connected to the elevations, which will hold the turbine, allowing the fins to oscillate backwards and forwards for greater effect.” The materials used in the design have been specified to be easy to procure and replace, while the cladding comes in a modular format, making it easier to repair.


ADF MARCH 2019


The lighthouse hotel will sit on a tension leg platform, “which works in the same way as a taut, moored buoy,” said the architects. The tethered buoyant structure is a large, semi-submersible floating vessel, which uses a heavy gravity vacuum anchor that fastens it to the seabed. The tension force is maintained in these vertical cables by adjusting the buoyancy of the floating platform, ensuring positive tension at all times.


The hotel is fabricated from a series of partly inflated, moulded ETFE membrane sections. Lightweight yet durable, these airlock sections split apart and float in the event of a rogue wave or an emergency.


The lantern room, located at the top of the hotel, is revealed when the elevations lower during storms. The Fresnel glass lantern light projects out over the entire area, creating an illuminated glass canopy lobby. The refracted light intensifies as it beams through and out into its surroundings, “blurring the edges between interior and exterior space,” said the architects.


Designed by OMI Architects, The Anaconda Cut is a 44 storey tower now completed at 131 metres tall, making it the tallest building in Salford. Delivered by contractor Renaker Build, the property sits in the Greengate area on the site of a former disused car park. The Anaconda Cut was the name given to a renowned engineering project in the 1970s, which straightened the sharp elbow in the river Irwell where the new development sits to prevent flooding. The building is clad in a seamless glazed curtain walling with gold coloured reflective metal panels, which “transforms into a shimmering gold plinth as the sun moves around it” said the architects. The lower brick element with gold panelling sits against one facade of the tower to provide continuity along the existing street and buildings below. The Anaconda Cut comprises of


349 rental apartments ranging from one to three-bedrooms, all with floor to ceiling glazed windows. The units have been designed to the highest specification and carefully curated amenities integrated throughout the building to enhance community living. Communal roof terraces and seating have been designed on the 17th floor along with a cinema screening room, while the entire 43rd floor is dedicated to a ‘Sky Lounge’ for all residents to enjoy with “unprecedented” views over the City of Manchester, and stretching as far as the Pennines.


7


© Craig Barker


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100