search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
72 EXTERNAL ENVELOPE


achieved in a number of different ways. It goes without saying that great insulation is key for any window, sliding door or curtain wall when looking for ways to minimise a building’s energy loss. Advancements in this area include thermal breaks, which are strips of rigid insulation with aluminium profiles sandwiched around them to improve thermal performance. This is an innovative way to embed insulation into the core of door and window systems, visibly improving energy saving in commercial and residential builds.


GREENWICH SQUARE The Greenwich Square residential development in London was fitted with Reynaers curtain walls, windows and sliding systems


Making use of daylight and finding smart ways to regulate it is another way to support sustainability in the built environment. For instance, developing slim profiles for large glass panes allows more light to come in, ultimately resulting in less energy being used for lighting and heating. Aluminium’s inherent properties make this a possibility; the material only expands by 1 mm per metre and it is incredibly strong, which allows for narrow window frames to support a large glass area. Alternatively, Brise Soleil systems have been developed to reduce heat gain within a building by


deflecting sunlight, therefore reducing the need to cool a building down. The future of sustainable innovation in glass and glazing is looking highly promising, from buildings using fritted glass, metal scrims or building-integrated photovoltaics, to the development of smart glass that is able to adapt its opacity in real time based on changing weather conditions to save energy.


The future of sustainable innovation in glass and glazing is looking highly promising, and as one of the most adaptable materials available, aluminium has the potential to be able to accommodate any new technique seamlessly. Whether it is adjusting the depth of the window frame to integrate various glass unit types such as triple glazing, or adapting to a unique building shape that uses metal scrims and photovoltaics to create a thermal buffer between the indoor and outdoor, aluminium will continue being a key part of making sustainability in buildings a reality in designs of the future.


Richard Hall is managing director at Reynaers UK


ARCHITECTURAL GLASS Glass floors


Balustrades and Staircases Automatic Doors Splashbacks


Complete supply and fit service


Please contact us for details 01903 733206


www.demon-designs.co.uk info@demon-designs.co.uk


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF MARCH 2019


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100