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location is defined by its roofline of Nordic Blue copper, a material that the architects have been exploring for over a decade. Hidden behind the listed facade of the


Royal Academy of Music’s Edwardian premises and located within the Regent’s Park conservation area, two distinct, outstanding performance spaces have been designed by Ian Ritchie Architects. Seamlessly integrated within the historic site, the project is expressed by facades and roofs clad in Nordic Blue pre-patinated copper from Aurubis. Nordic Blue is a factory-applied patina developed with properties and colours based on the same brochantite mineralogy found in natural patinas all over the world. In marine climates, the natural copper patina contains some copper chloride giving it a blue-green colour, emulated with Nordic Blue. As well as the solid patina colours, other intensities of patina flecks revealing some of the dark oxidised background material create ‘Living’ surfaces.


Nordic Blue Roofline I


an Ritchie Architects’ ingenious project for the Royal Academy of Music in a particularly challenging historic London


Ian Ritchie said: “I grew up in Brighton


and have always been fond of the copper roofs there, naturally patinated a turquoise blue by the sea air. Our interest in Nordic Blue copper goes back to 2004 and instigated research and development carried out by its manufacturers for a previous project. For the Royal Academy of Music project, Nordic Blue Living 1 provides just the right hue which will continue to develop naturally over time.” Despite the complexities of the constrained


site into which the myriad of functions of a modern opera and musical theatre were to be introduced, the copper-clad project was unanimously granted planning permission and listed building consent at the first submission, fully supported by all officers, English Heritage and the St Marylebone Society. Designed for both opera and musical


theatre productions, The Susie Sainsbury Theatre sits at the heart of the Academy. Within the old concrete walls, the Theatre incorporates 40 per cent more seating than previously through the addition of a balcony,


Crittall windows help keep youngsters safe


A state-of-the-art residential unit for vulnerable children and adolescents features Crittall’s Fendor CleanVent security windows. The unit, at Prestwich, is a Mental Health Services facility for young people with significant mental health needs and who may pose a high risk to themselves and


others. For this reason, windows in rooms to which patients have access must have an anti-ligature feature. The aluminium CleanVent windows specified complement this modern, non-institutional feel while satisfying the anti-ligature requirements, meeting the security level of the building as well as providing natural ventilation.


01914 170170 www.crittall-fendor.co.uk Music history brought to life with RMIG


The Fab Four sang “Baby, you can drive my car...” , and they would probably love to drive it into the multi-storey car park in Hayes, England, where a facade created from RMIG ImagePerf brings to life the famous photo of screaming fans


at a Beatles concert. Over 1,000 perforated sheets were manufactured and supplied by RMIG for the project. The technology used for RMIG ImagePerf made it possible for this iconic photograph to be reproduced using various hole sizes. The sheets were subsequently powder coated, making them weather resistant and ensuring that this amazing image will be enjoyed for many years to come.


01925 839610 www.city-emotion.com


as well as a larger orchestra pit, a stage wing and a fly tower. Above the Theatre, and acoustically isolated from all other buildings, the new 100-seat Recital Hall provides a further 230m2


of space. Creating a visual and physical link between


the old and new buildings is the Recital Hall’s new glazed lobby, which is primarily accessed from the main stairway and also by a glazed lift. The new light wells reveal the previously concealed Grade II rear facade, in which bricked-up windows have been reopened. Both of these beautifully finished, acoustically diverse spaces can be accessed independently and complete a suite of facilities for the Academy’s ambitious student body and world-class teaching staff and for public performances.


01875 812 144 www.nordiccopper.com Continued growth for Exlabesa’s ECW 50


Exlabesa Building Systems’ ECW 50 curtain walling system continues to deliver on all levels with a 20 per cent year of year growth being achieved. The ECW 50 curtain walling system has all the hallmarks of an intelligently designed system that has been designed to add value to fabricators’ and installers’ businesses. The system is fabricated using high quality European components and is tested to CWCT and UNE


EN 13830:2016 standards for weather resistance, safety in use, energy efficiency and heat retention.


sales@exlabesa.co.uk Flush Tilt and Turn windows solution


Profile 22 Flush Tilt and Turn windows were chosen for new residential and retail blocks and a community facility hub in Kirkholt, Rochdale. The project’s architects had specified the Flush Tilt and Turn Window for the project because of its ability to


deliver aluminium aesthetics but with a better price and performance. The Flush Tilt and Turn Window has a sash that is neatly positioned inside the frame of the window to create an elegant and sleek ‘flush’ appearance. It has a maximum opening size of 1450 x 2300mm and offers exceptional performance because it has an air permeability value of 600Pa, a water tightness value of 600 Pa and a wind resistance value of 2400Pa.


info@profile22.co.uk


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ADF FEBRUARY 2019


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